Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study 2018

3rd to 5th May, 2018

When

3rd to 5th May, 2018 09:00 am - 11:30 pm

Website: Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study 2018

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Where

UCLA Luskin Conference Center
425 Westwood Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095
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Thursday, 3rd May 2018

Time Centennial AB Collaboration Boardroom Centennial Terrace Royce Hall Germanic Seminar Room
11:00 am       Finnish Caucus
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Finnish Caucus

By:
Lotta Weckström
May 3, 2018, 11:00 am to 2:00 pm
Hall: Royce Hall Germanic Seminar Room Track: Luncheon Meeting
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1:00 pm   Executive Committee Meeting
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Executive Committee Meeting

Annual meeting of the executive committee

By:
SASS Executive Committee
May 3, 2018, 1:00 pm to 3:30 pm
Hall: Collaboration Boardroom Track: Business Meeting
 
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4:00 pm Pessimism of the intellect, optimism of the will
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Pessimism of the intellect, optimism of the will

With a starting point in Gramsci's famous phrase from his prison letters, Carsten Jensen will show the role this phrase has played in his authorship, both in his travel writing, his reporting, and his novels. The discussion following the keynote will be moderated by Claus Elholm Andersen (Univ of Wisconsin)

By:
Carsten Jensen
May 3, 2018, 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
Hall: Centennial AB Track: Keynote Type: Keynote
     
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6:00 pm     American Scandinavian Foundation Reception
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American Scandinavian Foundation Reception

Reception sponsored by the American Scandinavian Foundation, the Center for European and Russian Studies (UCLA), the UCLA Humanities Division, and the Scandinavian Section (UCLA)

By:
American Scandinavian Foundation
May 3, 2018, 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm
Hall: Centennial Terrace Track: Reception
 
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Friday, 4th May 2018

Time Centennial AB Legacy A Legacy B Optimist A Optimist B Exploration Illumination Laureate Collaboration Boardroom Centennial Terrace Royce Hall Germanic Seminar Room 1344 Schoenberger Hall Centennial C Entrepreneur Room
9:00 am Representing Norden’s eastern frontier in Nordic cinemas
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Representing Norden’s eastern frontier in Nordic cinemas

The paper follows up on my recent book, Beyond Eastern Noir. Reimagining Russia and Eastern Europe in Nordic Cinemas (published in March 2018 by Edinburgh UP). Using a number of contemporary Nordic films and television series, such as Me and My Moulton (Torill Kove, Norway, Canada, 2014), Bordertown (Finland, 2016) and The Square (Ruben Östlund, Sweden, 2017), the paper examines cinematically rendered narrative constructions of the borders that both divide and connect the Nordic countries and neighbouring Russia and Eastern Europe, and which – throughout the 20th century and earlier – have constituted Norden’s imaginary frontier towards the east. I will ask what these narratives do to the idea of Norden, how the Nordic self is rendered against the Russian/Eastern European Other, how stereotypical discourses are unsettled or reinforced, and what is Nordic about the representations of Russia and Eastern Europe in Nordic cinemas. 

By:
Anna Estera Mrozewicz
May 4, 2018, 9:00 am to 9:20 am
Hall: Centennial AB Track: Film Type: 20 min
Of Dragons and Warrior Women
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Of Dragons and Warrior Women

In Norse texts of the Volsung cycle, the main female characters act as warriors and are depicted as monsters, their monstrosity at once an index of their departure from gender norms and a link between them and the 'real' monsters of the story, the dragons.  Dragon traditions typically feature a kind of role reversal, or identity swapping, between dragon and dragonslayer, establishing an affinity between dragons and warrior-women, who assume a role usually reserved for the opposite sex.  Both dragons and women-warriors draw attention to the interchangeability of roles, their presence in the narrative facilitating an understanding of various kinds of identity as roles into and out of which one may slip, as one might don or remove a garment, or as one might grow or shed a skin.  The preoccupation in this tradition with identity slippage is reflected in a corresponding preoccupation with the transformative potential of bodily coverings.

By:
Kimberly Ball
May 4, 2018, 9:00 am to 9:20 am
Hall: Legacy A Track: Old Norse Type: 20 min
From 'Utvandrarna' to 'Swede Hollow' (via 'Allt för Sverige' and 'Bye, bye, Sverige'): On the Enduring Interest in Swedish America in Sweden
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From 'Utvandrarna' to 'Swede Hollow' (via 'Allt för Sverige' and 'Bye, bye, Sverige'): On the Enduring Interest in Swedish America in Sweden

This paper explores why the history of the Swedish migration to the U.S. continues to resonate with Swedish audiences decades after the end of the migration in the mid-1920´s. It deals with the long-term cultural consequences of the migration and its memories, and places it in the larger patterns of trans-national Sweden-American contacts. My empirical examples will focus on two novels, Ola Larsmo´s Swede Hollow from 2016 and Vilhem Moberg´s Emigrant series from the 1950s. How can their enduring popularities be explained?  Two possible answers include the Swedish images of the U.S. at the time of publication, and the question of geography--why the authors choose to place their stories in Minnesota. Further contextualization will be provided by the recent reality tv/infotainment series 'Allt för Sverige' and 'Bye, bye Sverige', broadcast on Swedish public television (SvT). What do these programs contribute to the contemporary Swedish understanding of the migration?

By:
Dag Blanck
May 4, 2018, 9:00 am to 9:20 am
Hall: Legacy B Track: Emigration Type: 20 min
Holocaust-references in contemporary Scandinavian literature
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Holocaust-references in contemporary Scandinavian literature

It is a widespread practice to compare traumatic events and experiences to the past. Incentives behind these analogies vary and the results likewise. To generalize about the qualities of comparison is problematic and the strategy must be to analyze the specific situations where historical analogies are used. In my paper, I will discuss two novels, Krakow by Aasne Linnestå (2007) and Invasionen (2017) by Madame Nielsen, as examples of different uses of Holocaust as an historical reference. Linnestå’s trauma is individual, since her story focuses on a woman, who loses her newborn child and for diffuse reasons travels to Auschwitz, knocked out by grief. Madame Nielsen’s novel compares the European refugee crisis to the German invasion of Denmark during WWII. During her journey from Greece to Denmark, following the refugee stream, she regularly alludes to the atrocities conducted by the Nazis. The two novels include very different kinds of Holocaust-references, and I will discuss the effects and implications in each case.

By:
Unni Langås
May 4, 2018, 9:00 am to 9:20 am
Hall: Optimist A Track: Trauma Fictions Type: 20 min
The Little Mermaid: How one seemingly harmless little girl came to be a site of struggle
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The Little Mermaid: How one seemingly harmless little girl came to be a site of struggle

The statue of The Little Mermaid is an example of how Hans Christian Andersen’s legacy circulates in his prosperity. In branding and tourism contexts, the statue is frequently used to represent something particularly Danish, but simultaneously, it is frequently embedded in activist and anti-hegemonic articulations. In this talk, I take a closer look at this use of cultural heritage with a specific focus on how national and anti-national communities use the mermaid as a medium to strengthen their arguments.

By:
Anne Klara Bom
May 4, 2018, 9:00 am to 9:20 am
Hall: Optimist B Track: Danish Cultural Branding Type: 20 min
Skogens folk: The Economy of the Forest in Trygve Gulbranssen’s Bjørndal-Trilogy
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Skogens folk: The Economy of the Forest in Trygve Gulbranssen’s Bjørndal-Trilogy

Trygve Gulbranssen’s Bjørndal-trilogy has sold millions of copies the world over. Literary scholarship has classified the trilogy as trivial, or Blut und Boden-literature, yet it tells a complex story of cultural, moral, and economic development. From its very beginning, the novel Og bakom synger skogene establishes a conflict between the people of the forest ('skogens folk') and the people from the lowland who ascribe 'trollskap, villhet og slagsmål' to the people of the forest. The forest thus embodies a frontier situation. Whereas revenge and physical violence dominate initially, the struggle between the lowland and forest neighbors soon takes the form of economic competition. With the help of a new management system, improved agricultural techniques, and the use of the forest as a resource, the village of the foresters surpasses its rivals. However, the accumulation of capital and thus power, threatens to corrupt the character of the main protagonist. The talk investigates the relationship between representations of nature and concepts of development in the trilogy.

By:
Frederike Felcht
May 4, 2018, 9:00 am to 9:20 am
Hall: Exploration Track: Unnatural Frontiers Type: 20 min
Austere or tender? Ideals of family in the national discourse
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Austere or tender? Ideals of family in the national discourse

This paper engages family ideals as reflected in the Kalevala (1849) created by Elias Lönnrot. Lönnrot aimed at representing oral poetry in a widely available written form to the gentry who often had a poor knowledge of Finnish language and a narrow experience of rural life. The aim of the paper is to illustrate what kind of  individual aims and public purposes meet in text-making process. Lönnrot made observations on a good life in his writings, but changed emphasis of his ideas regarding to different readers. While promoting the bourgeois idea of the family as an emotional unit with parents and children, Lönnrot emphasized the pragmatic and disciplined mother in the Kalevala and criticized the emotional and moral atmosphere in peasant families, which he saw as austere. The paper discusses ideological notions of family framed and produced for certain audiences and historical purposes.

By:
Niina Hämäläinen
May 4, 2018, 9:00 am to 9:20 am
Hall: Illumination Track: Nationhood in Finland Type: 20 min
Not available for scheduling Not available for scheduling A New History of Scandinavian Literature
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A New History of Scandinavian Literature

In this paper I will present and reflect upon the work with a recently published history of Scandinavian literature, Nordens litteratur (Studentlitteratur 2017), edited by myself and professor Margareta Petersson. Although written in Swedish the book is an attempt to give a comprehensive and coherent account of the literature in all the Nordic countries from the Viking age to the present time. With examples picked from the last chapter of the book ('Nordens litteratur i världen') I will also try to show what kind of Nordic literature that through history has been aesthetically influential abroad and thus contributed to World Literature at large. The discussion of these examples will hopefully serve as an introduction to the paper 'How to Study Nordic World literature', given by my colleague Anders Mortensen.

By:
Rikard Schönström
May 4, 2018, 9:00 am to 9:20 am
Hall: Centennial C Track: Literary History Type: 20 min
Book Display
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Book Display

Ongoing book display by visiting publishers

By:
SASS
May 4, 2018, 9:00 am to 5:25 pm
Hall: Entrepreneur Room Track: Book display
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9:20 am Back to the Future: Echoes of the Historic Norwegian Resistance in TV2’s Okkupert
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Back to the Future: Echoes of the Historic Norwegian Resistance in TV2’s Okkupert

My paper links the popular contemporary Norwegian thriller series 'Okkupert' with its Second World War antecedent by underlining the aspects of the series that explicitly aim to draw parallels with the historic Norwegian motstandbevegelse under the Nazi occupation with a fictional contemporary Russian occupation.  My paper will also interrogate the striking ambivalence surrounding contemporary Norwegian identity as presented in the series’ depiction of collaboration with an occupying imperial power.

By:
Patrick Wen
May 4, 2018, 9:20 am to 9:40 am
Hall: Centennial AB Track: Film Type: 20 min
Conscious Horses in Medieval Nordic Thought
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Conscious Horses in Medieval Nordic Thought

The central role of horses in medieval Nordic life and thought is abundantly clear from many different kinds of source materials -- archeological, literary, visual images, even documents such as testaments. Horses served a range of functions from the pragmatic to the symbolic, and could be both a means to and a marker of high status. This paper will examine ways in which medieval Nordic texts and images depict the close relationships between humans and horses, and especially the ways in which horses are depicted as conscious individuals to a much higher degree than other animals.

By:
Tracey R. Sands
May 4, 2018, 9:20 am to 9:40 am
Hall: Legacy A Track: Old Norse Type: 20 min
Swedish in America, American Abroad: Elsa Nordstrom in Paris, 1923-1924
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Swedish in America, American Abroad: Elsa Nordstrom in Paris, 1923-1924

Elsa Nordstrom was born in Worcester, MA in 1904.  Her parents, Hjalmar and Emma Nordstrom, both born in Sweden but immigrating to the US in the 1890s, raised Elsa as an 'American,' yet fully participated in the large Swedish community that settled in this industrial town west of Boston.  The family prospered and Elsa became a very talented violinist, giving concerts throughout the region.  In 1923, Elsa traveled, unaccompanied, to Paris to further her studies.  Her letters home reveal an interesting tension in her identity, she is both American and Swedish, and she gravitates toward both ex-patriot communities then living in post-war France.  This paper utilizes the more than one hundred letters and cards she sent home to survey this duality, fully revealed when she travels to Sweden in January 1924.  This paper examines the challenge of identity children of immigrants experienced in an alien environment.

By:
Steven Sabol
May 4, 2018, 9:20 am to 9:40 am
Hall: Legacy B Track: Emigration Type: 20 min
Gunvor Hofmo: 'The Mad Aunt' of Norwegian poetry?
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Gunvor Hofmo: 'The Mad Aunt' of Norwegian poetry?

There is a strong tradition of reading Norwegian modernist writer Gunvor Hofmo’s early poetry in the light of two biographical events, both of which can be characterized as traumatic: First, the loss of her close friend Ruth Maier, who perished in the holocaust, and second, Hofmo’s deteriorating mental health throughout the 1950s, which leads to a 22-year long confinement in a mental institution. In my entry, I would like to emphasize how these biographical circumstances are key elements the mythology surrounding Hofmo’s literary persona. To a great extent, this mythology corresponds with general myths and prejudice concerning literary expressions of (female) loss, mourning and madness.However, in some poems like 'Den sinnsyke tanten' (1946)[1], Hofmo exhibits a strong meta-consciousness regarding these stereotypes, a nuance in her poetry that in my view is understated. This suggests a quite self-conscious poet that negotiates, and to some extent criticizes, the cultural tradition she is later absorbed by. [1] Litaraly, title of the poem translates to 'The mad aunt'.

By:
Fredrik Parelius
May 4, 2018, 9:20 am to 9:40 am
Hall: Optimist A Track: Trauma Fictions Type: 20 min
The Jutland Heath as a Danish-American literary landscape and the construction of Rebild Bakker as a memorial place: Hans Christian Andersen, St. St. Blicher, Jeppe Aakjær
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The Jutland Heath as a Danish-American literary landscape and the construction of Rebild Bakker as a memorial place: Hans Christian Andersen, St. St. Blicher, Jeppe Aakjær

For centuries, part of the Jutland peninsula in Denmark was covered by heathland. The heath was considered a picturesque contrast to the cities and during the nineteenth century, writers like Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875) and Steen Steensen Blicher (1782-1848) created the picture of the heath as an exotic and wild place. From around 1870 the heath was cultivated, but a number of poets and artists, for exampel Jeppe Aakjær, sided with the heath. They defended the remains parts of the heath and among the places defended, was Rebild Bakker. This place was purchased by Max Henius, a Danish-American industrialist in Wisconsin, in 1912 and now Rebild Bakker (The Hills of Rebild) became a memorial landscape for July 4th for The Danish-American Society. In my paper I will show how landscapes, in this case the Jutland region, are constructed as cultural heritage and a kind of national brand in the literary tradition.

By:
Johannes Noerregaard Frandsen
May 4, 2018, 9:20 am to 9:40 am
Hall: Optimist B Track: Danish Cultural Branding Type: 20 min
Verner von Heidenstam's 'Tiveden': Poetry of Place, National Monument, and Ecopoetry Avant la Lettre
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Verner von Heidenstam's 'Tiveden': Poetry of Place, National Monument, and Ecopoetry Avant la Lettre

Heidenstam's Dikter [Poems] (1895) is widely regarded as the author's first mature poetical work, and a central piece of The Nineties. In this paper, I will focus on the ecopoetic elements of the quite extensive piece 'Tiveden'. 'Tiveden' is an old place-name denoting what was once a large forest area which in older ages formed a natural boundary between the Swedish realms of Götaland and Svealand. The poem focuses on describing the forest as wild nature, as something different from the cultivated woods, not affected by conventional forestry, and very far from falling victim to any kind of pastoral idealization. Thus, 'Tiveden' becomes a good example of two of the ecocritical 'large-scale metaphors', which Garrard (2012) baptized 'wilderness' – a metaphor 'signifying nature in a state uncontaminated by civilization', but also a place for 'dwelling' and thus containing motifs with an 'appeal to ancestry, family and tradition' (Garrard, 2012).

By:
Håkan Sandgren
May 4, 2018, 9:20 am to 9:40 am
Hall: Exploration Track: Unnatural Frontiers Type: 20 min
Nationalized voices: Delving into practices of folklore selection in Finland
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Nationalized voices: Delving into practices of folklore selection in Finland

Over the past two centuries, folklore collecting practices were instrumental in constructing and shaping the image of the purity of national culture in Finland. Using folktales about the Roma as told by Finnish rural peasants, I investigate how collecting practices reflected a broadly shared cultural engagement between the nation-builders of folklore scholarship and the rural sedentary people in their everyday life practices. Because the policy of collecting folklore only targeted the majority groups of the rural people, their lore and their views were considered the most important and more valuable than the ones of the minority groups. By contrast, the Finnish Roma, as living on the margins from rural communities, were denigrated through the narration of tales that ridiculed them and, at times, featured them as antagonists in brutal narratives. Folktales about the Roma also reveal the folkloric archival policies of the 19th and early 20th centuries Finland.

By:
Eija Stark
May 4, 2018, 9:20 am to 9:40 am
Hall: Illumination Track: Nationhood in Finland Type: 20 min
How to Study Nordic World Literature
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How to Study Nordic World Literature

At the Centre for Scandinavian Studies, Lund University, an international research project on Nordic World Literature will be launched in 2019. The main objective is to examine how Nordic literature of significant international importance during the last two centuries has contributed to shaping the ideas of Nordic identity. When the reception and canonization processes are studied in which the most influential Nordic literature is promoted and ideas about different kinds of Scandinavian exceptionalism are created, confronted and modified, important differences become apparent not only concerning which authors who have played a vital role where and when, but also between Nordic identity reflection and the outside world's views of Scandinavian character. These investigations of how literature since the era of Romanticism has essentially shaped the international opinions about the Nordic region will be carried out in collaboration with scholars working at prominent Scandinavian studies departments in Europe, North America and Asia.

By:
Anders Mortensen
May 4, 2018, 9:20 am to 9:40 am
Hall: Centennial C Track: Literary History Type: 20 min
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9:40 am The Adaption of Norwegian Skam into American Shame
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The Adaption of Norwegian Skam into American Shame

The aim of this proposal is to explore the development of the adaption of the Norwegian teen drama television series Skam into the American version titled Shame. The exploration will focus on the challenges that the creator and director Julie Andem expresses on her Instagram account: 'It will be a challenge try to make it (Skam/Shame) in a different culture, in a different language' (Andem, 2017). In this presentation, the main focus will be on the challenges that the narration of teen sexuality is likely to imply, due to both different cultural attitudes toward adolescent sexuality in Norway and the US, and to the ongoing #metoo-movement, raising questions on the fierce boundary between sexuality on equal terms and sexual harassment of girls. In the Norwegian Skam, made before the #metoo-movement, the question is touched on without being lifted up to the surface.

By:
Sarah Ljungquist
May 4, 2018, 9:40 am to 10:00 am
Hall: Centennial AB Track: Film Type: 20 min
The Otherworld and the Hunt: Dogs and the Tristan Legend
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The Otherworld and the Hunt: Dogs and the Tristan Legend

The Tristan legend underwent many iterations through the Middle Ages, propelled by its popularity beyond its Celtic origins while still retaining increasingly obscure pieces of its early variants. One such feature is Tristan’s consistent association with dogs. In the Celtic tradition, polychromatic hunting hounds from the Otherworld feature prominently across the legendary cycles and folklore. However, upon Tristan’s movement into the French corpus, the hunting and otherworldly qualities diverge into two separate animals. This separation is retained in Gottfried von Strassbourg’s German translation of Thomas of Britain’s French Tristan, but the Norse Tristrams saga ok Ísönd, also a translation of Thomas of Britain, merges the two dogs back into a single otherworldly hunting hound. This paper will look at how the dog’s Celtic characteristics have reunited in Tristrams saga despite the lineage of translations, and address the implications of the dog within its newfound Scandinavian context.

By:
Rosie Taylor
May 4, 2018, 9:40 am to 10:00 am
Hall: Legacy A Track: Old Norse Type: 20 min
Imagining Borders and Heartland through Legend
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Imagining Borders and Heartland through Legend

For the Swedish Americans, local historical legends about immigration and community building were also narratives of contact at physical and figurative boundaries. The Swedish immigrants made a dramatic geographical move to the American Midwest and West, stepping into relationships with indigenous groups, other ethnic groups, Westering Americans, and economically and racially differing groups. In their local historical legends, cultural differences could be elided or intensified. Immigrants could imagine they were part of pure and empty 'heartland' in middle America for which borders with others were vague and remote or they could acknowledge and characterize the others with whom they interacted. This article is based on more than 80 legends embedded within local histories produced by amateur historians and local history societies in the Midwest and West spanning 1840-1914. This body of folklore offers numerous instances of character and landscape encounters through which the immigrants anchored  themselves in American localities.

By:
Jennifer Eastman Attebery
May 4, 2018, 9:40 am to 10:00 am
Hall: Legacy B Track: Emigration Type: 20 min
The War Exists and it also doesn’t': Childhood and Memories of War within the Nordic Everyday
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The War Exists and it also doesn’t': Childhood and Memories of War within the Nordic Everyday

Susanna Alakoski’s novel Svinalängorna (2006) and Eija Hetekivi-Olsson’s novel Ingenbarnsland (2012) are both coming-of-age narratives of children of Finnish immigrants in Sweden that connect memories of Second World War and their affects on the everyday experience within the developing Nordic welfare states of the 1970s and 1980s. In addition to the feelings of displacement due to class and ethnicity within the Swedish welfare state, the children experience traumatic affects of silenced memories of the Second World War within their domestic spaces. By analyzing the child’s embodied experience with the gendered and national affects around her, I will argue that, as an elaboration of Marianne Hirsch’ theory of ‘postmemory,’ the children figure similarly to Kathryn Stockton’s queer children who ‘grow to the side of cultural ideals’ and are constructed as having a diverse perspective on remembering the Second World War and its impact on the Nordic societies.

By:
Liina-Ly Roos
May 4, 2018, 9:40 am to 10:00 am
Hall: Optimist A Track: Trauma Fictions Type: 20 min
Branding Danish American Diaspora Communities
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Branding Danish American Diaspora Communities

As more than 300,000 Danes immigrated to the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, they established communities from Chicago to California. Many of these communities featured Danish churches, colleges, and folk high schools, but the increasing integration of Danish Americans into mainstream American culture over the past century has stripped most of these communities of markers of their ethnic identities. This paper demonstrates how three Danish American communities—Tyler, Minnesota; Elk Horn, Iowa; and Solvang, California--have sought to counter this trend and increase their own attractiveness as tourist destinations by enhancing their brand as Danish American diaspora communities, often through emphasizing their connection with such Danish cultural icons as N.F.S. Grundtvig and H.C. Andersen. 

By:
Julie K Allen
May 4, 2018, 9:40 am to 10:00 am
Hall: Optimist B Track: Danish Cultural Branding Type: 20 min
Forest of Finns' facing the frontier of fear of the foreign
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Forest of Finns' facing the frontier of fear of the foreign

The so called Forest Finns (SE: skogsfinnar; NO: skogfinner) were Finnish migrants who settled in the forests of Sweden and Norway during the late 16th and 17th century. What is still today called Finnskog(en) crosses the border of the two Scandinavian countries.In a Swedish literary context, this forest area of mixture and mystery, inclusion and alienation, has been loaded with a great deal of imaginative power producing both wishes and fears and it has been represented both from within and from without.I will explore the ambiguous sense of Otherness and Home, of foreigners and friends, represented and/or produced in Dan Andersson's poem/song 'Julvisa från Finnmarken' from 1917 and the chapter 'Finnprästen' in Selma Lagerlöf's novel Lilliecrona's Home from 1911, I will also use som concepts from Place/Space Studies as Foucault's heterotopia in analyzing the literary Finn Forest.

By:
Anna Smedberg Bondesson
May 4, 2018, 9:40 am to 10:00 am
Hall: Exploration Track: Unnatural Frontiers Type: 20 min
Absolute Beginners? Petsamo and Finnish Colonialist Discourse
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Absolute Beginners? Petsamo and Finnish Colonialist Discourse

In 1920 Finland was given a corridor to the Arctic Sea. This area, called Petsamo in Finnish, was for many Finns seen as part of a Greater Finland expansionist ideology. A colonialist discourse was actively adapted when treating the future prospects and possible development policies of this peripheral area in the young Finnish Republic. The paper will explore a variety of 'colonial policy texts' on Petsamo and analyze how they relate to questions of nationhood, indigenous culture and cultural diversity. The paper will also ponder the logics of a Finnish colonialist discourse as part of a modern nation-building process. Petsamo was lost in 1944 and is today part of Russia. As part of a claim for a trans-border history research the paper points at an episode in Finland’s Arctic history that has not been studies that much within academia.

By:
Peter Gustav Stadius
May 4, 2018, 9:40 am to 10:00 am
Hall: Illumination Track: Nationhood in Finland Type: 20 min
'Bokhylla' or Norway’s literary heritage is now available as a single file: Its History
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'Bokhylla' or Norway’s literary heritage is now available as a single file: Its History

In 2017 the National Library of Norway, as the first library in the world, completed the digitization of its entire literary heritage up until the year 2001. It is now accessible to all Norwegians as 'Bokhylla.no' or for researchers and digital humanists even abroad as a data dump upon request, literally a single file. The history of the construction of almost the entire literary heritage as a digital artifact is long and involves a series of negotiations and innovations going back to 1999. Today it serves as a model for many countries. The approach in this presentation explores the close connection between a series of innovations making 'Bokhylla' possible. The innovations take place within the fields of copyright law, data architecture and aesthetics (the user interface). Additionally, the results from recent user surveys will be presented.  Røssaaks project on 'Bokhylla' is part of the Norwegian research-project 'Digitization and Diversity'.

By:
Eivind Røssaak
May 4, 2018, 9:40 am to 10:00 am
Hall: Centennial C Track: Digital Humanities Type: 20 min
9:45 am
9:50 am
9:55 am
10:00 am Race Jokes and Shameless Encounters with Asylum Seekers in Contemporary Norwegian Film Comedies
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Race Jokes and Shameless Encounters with Asylum Seekers in Contemporary Norwegian Film Comedies

I analyze Jan Vardøen’s House of Norway (2016) and Rune Denstad Langlo’s Welcome to Norway! (2016) as multicultural film comedies that set out to ridicule and shame Norwegians at the height of the Syrian refugee crisis. In the case of the first film, these are Norwegians who, in their encounter with refugees, tend to be overly nationalistic. In the case of the second film, the shameless Norwegian is simply cold and cynical. With reference to Lauren Berlant and Sianne Ngai I furthermore point out the ambivalence of racist jokes, drawing also on the films’ reception. Specifically, I analyze House of Norway as building on a tension between the fish-out-of-water comedy genre and an understanding of (post)national identity being performed ironically. In Welcome to Norway! I focus on the film as a black-white buddy film and on its use of race jokes that may come across as both racist and anti-racist.

By:
Elisabeth Oxfeldt
May 4, 2018, 10:00 am to 10:20 am
Hall: Centennial AB Track: Film Type: 20 min
Old Norse Versions of Indo-European Gigantism
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Old Norse Versions of Indo-European Gigantism

Many gigantic characters populate Old Norse sagas: Örvar-Oddr’s 18-foot-long coffin equals the hero’s tremendous height (Örvar-Odds saga ch. 32); Klaufi is five ells tall (Svarfdæla saga ch. 15); Hörðr is a head taller than most other men by the age of fifteen (Harðar saga ok Hólmverja ch. 11); Ívarr becomes as heavy as a boulder on the back of Síbilia (Ragnars saga loðbrókar ch.12); Göngu-Hrólfr is so large horses cannot carry him (Göngu-Hrólfs saga ch.4); and Þorsteinn is too big to fit through most doors (Þorsteins þáttr bæjarmagns ch. 1). This paper adduces comparanda for these motifs from a wide range of Indo-European epics including Greek, Indian, Persian, Old Irish, Middle Welsh, South Slavic, and Armenian. It argues that all these descriptions from Old Norse sagas derive ultimately from Indo-European traditions of gigantic heroes and shows how the Icelandic authors modify such expressions.

By:
Matthew Horrell
May 4, 2018, 10:00 am to 10:20 am
Hall: Legacy A Track: Old Norse Type: 20 min
Silencing unpopular views
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Silencing unpopular views

Jón Halldórsson (1838–1919) of Stóruvellir, North Iceland, emigrated to Wisconsin in 1872. He settled in Nebraska in 1875 as a farmer and died in Chicago in 1919. Jón Halldórsson had no formal education but he was an ardent reader and letter writer. He also wrote about his journey to the US, the Icelandic settlement in Nebraska, etc. to newspapers in Iceland and in New Iceland in Manitoba. But he was met with censorship. The information derives from his personal correspondence, not least with his old friend Benedikt Jónsson of Auðnir, North Iceland. However, when Halldórsson started criticizing the lack of opportunities for poor people in Iceland and the poor relief his friend stopped answering his letters. The paper deals with the views of Jón Halldórsson which the newspaper editors and his friend could not accept.

By:
Úlfar Bragason
May 4, 2018, 10:00 am to 10:20 am
Hall: Legacy B Track: Emigration Type: 20 min
Trauma Fictions Question and Answer
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Trauma Fictions Question and Answer

Session Chair: Unni Langås

By:
Unni Langås
May 4, 2018, 10:00 am to 10:30 am
Hall: Optimist A Track: Trauma Fictions
Funen means Fine': The branding of Funen and Odense in the works of Hans Christian Andersen
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Funen means Fine': The branding of Funen and Odense in the works of Hans Christian Andersen

The city of Odense, birthplace of Hans Christian Andersen, diligently uses the story of its internationally renowned townsman to brand itself. But how did Andersen himself actually regard his birthplace and the island on which it is located? In this paper, I will discuss how Andersen describes Funen and the city of Odense in his novels and fairy tales. Particularly, the interlacing of legends, myths and historical facts presented in the texts will be in focus and discussed in relation to romantic philosophy and current ecocritical theory.

By:
Torsten Bøgh Thomsen
May 4, 2018, 10:00 am to 10:20 am
Hall: Optimist B Track: Danish Cultural Branding Type: 20 min
The Writing's in the Snow: Non-Human Agency in Karl Erik Forsslund's Djur (1900) and Helena Granströms Det som en gång var (2016)
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The Writing's in the Snow: Non-Human Agency in Karl Erik Forsslund's Djur (1900) and Helena Granströms Det som en gång var (2016)

The forest is a liminal space that has been charged with a large variety of values in Nordic literature. Since the Industrial Revolution, however, the forest has been transformed in human imagination, from representing the unknown to being seen as consumable. The development has sparked literary protests and a discussion on the relationship between humankind and nature. This paper investigates two Swedish fictional works that can be read as arguments in this discussion, and how they relate to each other. One is contemporary, Helena Granström’s Det som en gång var (What Once Was, 2016), the other one, Karl-Erik Forsslund’s Djur (Animals) was published in 1900. Seen together, they point to differences between contemporary ecological thinking and visions of nature at the turn of the century 1900, but – most interestingly – this paper will show that what is said today has been said before, and that we might learn something from this. 

By:
Andreas Hedberg
May 4, 2018, 10:00 am to 10:20 am
Hall: Exploration Track: Unnatural Frontiers Type: 20 min
Memory of Suffering and Salvation: Discourse of Martyrdom in Written Testimonies of Ingrian Finns
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Memory of Suffering and Salvation: Discourse of Martyrdom in Written Testimonies of Ingrian Finns

Ingrian Finns used to live by the Gulf of Finland, in the area in Russia surrounding the city of Saint Petersburg/Leningrad, bordering Estonia in the west and Finland in the north. Ingrian Finns descend from Lutheran Finns who immigrated to the area in the 17th century, during the era of the Swedish Empire. My paper explores the functions of various forms of martyrdom discourse in written testimonies of Ingrian Finns. I will argue that in the case of Ingrian Finns, the discourse of martyrdom is related to the performance of Ingrian identity, and to the public recognition of experienced oppression and persecution. The data of my research consists of memoirs and letters written by Ingrians during the 20th Century. These works reflect the turbulent twentieth century of Ingrian Finns, comprising of the Russian revolution, the repressions of the 1930s and 1940s, migrations, deportations, and the Gulag.

By:
Ulla Savolainen
May 4, 2018, 10:00 am to 10:20 am
Hall: Illumination Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
The Literary Landscapes of Hans Christian Andersen: Digital Methods in Romantic Scandinavian Literature
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The Literary Landscapes of Hans Christian Andersen: Digital Methods in Romantic Scandinavian Literature

The nineteenth-century Romantic Movement is known for its reimaginings of place and locale throughout art and literature. The Romantics framed the poetic 'landscape' as the nexus of space, time, and sublime emotional experience. A remarkable traveler of his time, Hans Christian Andersen especially celebrated the erosion of fixed, geographic boundaries in his literary landscapes. New digital methods in literature offer new approaches to probing how Andersen’s texts redefined literary space through travel and fairytale frontiers. Through computational text analysis, I investigate Andersen’s gaze on national landscapes, questioning how he positions Scandinavia within a globalizing, increasingly-interconnected Europe and the extent to which he embraced a national project. In doing so, I will demonstrate how the intersection of digital methods and hermeneutics can widen the domain of the literary historian and enable us to explore large, transnational spaces from the literature they inhabit.

By:
Sara Ann Knutson
May 4, 2018, 10:00 am to 10:20 am
Hall: Centennial C Track: Literary History Type: 20 min
10:05 am
10:10 am
10:15 am
10:20 am Film Question and Answer
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Film Question and Answer

Session chair: Patrick Wen

By:
Patrick Wen
May 4, 2018, 10:20 am to 10:30 am
Hall: Centennial AB Track: Film
Old Norse question and answer
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Old Norse question and answer

Session Chair: Kimberly Ball

By:
Kimberly Ball
May 4, 2018, 10:20 am to 10:30 am
Hall: Legacy A Track: Old Norse
Emigration Question and Answer
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Emigration Question and Answer

Session Chair: Jennifer Eastman Attebery

By:
Jennifer Eastman Attebery
May 4, 2018, 10:20 am to 10:30 am
Hall: Legacy B Track: Emigration
Danish Cultural Branding Question and Answer
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Danish Cultural Branding Question and Answer

Session Chair: Julie K. Allen
This panel considers and questions ways in which cultural figures, such as Hans Christian Andersen and Jeppe Aakjær, and geographic spaces, from the Jutlandic heath to Danish American towns, have been encoded through literature, film, and tourism as quintessentially Danish.

By:
Julie K Allen
May 4, 2018, 10:20 am to 10:30 am
Hall: Optimist B Track: Danish Cultural Branding
Unnatural Frontiers Question and Answer
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Unnatural Frontiers Question and Answer

Session Chair: Tiffany Nicole White

By:
Tiffany Nicole White
May 4, 2018, 10:20 am to 10:30 am
Hall: Exploration Track: Unnatural Frontiers
Nationhood in Finland Question and Answer
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Nationhood in Finland Question and Answer

This panel addresses the frontier-crossing narratives related to the makings of the nation during the nineteenth and early twentieth century Finland. More concretely, it seeks to analyze the numerous discordant ways in which the ideal Finnish nation (or people) was constructed through literature and folklore. We look at the connotations that were ideologically as well as emotionally attached to agricultural country folk by the zealous intellectuals and their wider society. We also ask, how and why certain groups were excluded from the particular nationalistic discourses. In Finland, as elsewhere in Europe, the spread of Romantic nationalism led many educated men to define a ‘people’ through a strong sentiment of national belonging, often linked to language, history, religion and cultural character, as well as to a distrust of those who do not share these features. At the same time as the construction of the nation and the formation of the nation-state were taking place, industrialization, urbanization and other aspects of modernization proceeded. Ethnologist Orvar Löfgren has argued that praising the traditional self-sufficient peasant life as ‘characteristically national’ can be interpreted as an attempt to create a common national identity in a period of sharpened class conflicts. As a result, a wide array of the then existing cultural customs, ideas and values, such as that of the industrial working-class, the ethnic minorities or the urban town-dwellers, were disdained or even silenced. The aim of this panel is to explore the social tensions and cultural conflicts between the intellectuals and their writings and the wider society and ask: What kind of implicit and explicit frontier-crossings existed in the makings of a nation and what kind of utopias did the nationalist projects construct? The panel discusses the ways in which diverse understandings of nationhood in Finland have been framed and produced

By:
Eija Stark
May 4, 2018, 10:20 am to 10:30 am
Hall: Illumination Track: Nationhood in Finland
Literary History Question and Answer
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Literary History Question and Answer

Session Chair: Anders Motensen

By:
Anders Mortensen
May 4, 2018, 10:20 am to 10:30 am
Hall: Centennial C Track: Literary History
10:25 am
10:30 am Coffee Break at Luskin center
10:35 am
10:40 am
10:45 am Strindberg, copywriter? Advertising and Perception in Strindberg
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Strindberg, copywriter? Advertising and Perception in Strindberg

This paper examines advertising and its impact on sense perception in the works of August Strindberg. This theme is present already in Strindberg’s early journalistic work and notably in Röda rummet (The Red Room), where the protagonist refuses to write an advertising pamphlet disguised as a short story. Later on, he often inscribes ads, brand names and logotypes into the literary texts themselves. However, Strindberg was at the same time attracted to and repelled by the remarkable power of modern advertising to shape the desires and perceptions of its audience. In his confrontations with advertising, he discusses modern modes of perception, and especially the possibilities of aesthetic contemplation of works of art in an era submerged by advertising. These reflections recall other writers of early modernism, like Baudelaire, Rachilde, Zola and Hamsun, but they also speak directly to our own time.

By:
Gustaf Marcus
May 4, 2018, 10:45 am to 11:05 am
Hall: Centennial AB Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Sigurd Hoel’s Crises of Memory: A Reading of Møte ved milepelen (1947)
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Sigurd Hoel’s Crises of Memory: A Reading of Møte ved milepelen (1947)

Susan Rubin Suleiman helpfully defines a crisis of memory as 'a moment of choice, and sometimes a predicament or a conflict, about remembrance of the past, whether by individuals or by groups' (Crises of Memory and the Second World War, Harvard University Press, 2006). This paper will address the idea of a 'crisis of memory' at two levels in connection to Sigurd Hoel’s canonical novel about Nazi the occupation of Norway, Møte ved milepelen (Meeting at the Milestone, 1947). First the historical-contextual and group level: the novel was finished and published at the moment of landssvikoppgjøret (the legal purge of collaborators after the war), and it can be seen as part of a debate about the shaping of historical narratives of resistance and collaboration in Norwegian public memory. Second, the fictional and individual level: the narrator experiences a crisis of memory within the novel, in which what he knows about himself and his politics as a resistance member is destabilized as he is confronted with the consequences of newly remembered past actions. This leads to a narrative and psychological tension between his self-knowledge and his returning memories. My analysis of Hoel’s novel shows how it pertains to what Suleiman argues is at issue in a crisis of memory: an individual or group’s self-representation.

By:
Dean Krouk
May 4, 2018, 10:45 am to 11:05 am
Hall: Legacy A Track: Crises of Memory Type: 20 min
Quasi AEgyptiacas pyramides': Norse Antiquities and Ancient Egypt in Historia de gentibus septentrionalibus
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Quasi AEgyptiacas pyramides': Norse Antiquities and Ancient Egypt in Historia de gentibus septentrionalibus

In Historia, Olaus Magnus occasionally compares Norse runes, runestones, and grave mounds to hieroglyphs, obelisks, and pyramids. This paper argues that these comparisons are not only rhetorical devices for the edification of continental readers. They also make implicit claims about what Norse material culture should mean to Sweden. This paper will contextualize Historia within the sixteenth-century enthusiasm for ancient Egypt and the scholarly attempts to decode hieroglyphs. Hieroglyphs’ stylized mimesis of the natural world was (incorrectly) believed to encode an ancient philosophy. For instance, the bee was thought to signify the monarch; its honey represents clemency and stinger sovereign wrath. This paper will consider how Magnus imbues runes with similar provenance to imply that the Norse understood natural law. This was part of Magnus’ effort to rehabilitate the image of newly Lutheran Sweden, with evidence from its pagan past, as deeply pious and thus worthy of Catholic efforts at reconversion. 

By:
Zachary Harrison Blinkinsop
May 4, 2018, 10:45 am to 11:05 am
Hall: Legacy B Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Mediating trauma in Norwegian novels on 22nd of July 2011
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Mediating trauma in Norwegian novels on 22nd of July 2011

The problem of accessing traumatic experiences has been dealt with in classical psychoanalytic theory by conceptualizing the traumatic experience as a prelinguistic event that universally causes dissociation (Freud), and different versions of critical theory have based their claims on this presupposition. This line of tradition has been challenged and renewed by contemporary approaches in literary studies that focus more on trauma’s contextually determined specificity and on the potential productivity in various social processes of remembrance (Winkel-Holm, Balaev). Drawing on this work our paper investigates three novels dealing with the Norwegian terror attacks of 22nd of July 2011: Brit Bildøens Sju dager i august (2014), Mattis Øybø Elskere (2016) and Jan Kjærstad Berge (2017). We will discuss how these novels treat terrorism as traumatic events, emphasizing how different media and social practices contribute to producing various ways of grounding, a sense of belonging as well as a reflection on and a critique of this search itself.

By:
Anne Gjelsvik, Ingvild Folkvord
May 4, 2018, 10:45 am to 11:05 am
Hall: Optimist A Track: Trauma Fictions Type: 20 min
Teaching Scandinavian Immigration History in a Contemporary Perspective: Uses of Heritage at Augustana College
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Teaching Scandinavian Immigration History in a Contemporary Perspective: Uses of Heritage at Augustana College

Augustana College in Illinois has since 1860 served as a repository of Swedish-American heritage, housing a vast collection of immigration records in the Swenson Center archives. With the changing demographics of Augustana's undergraduates, the Scandinavian program has sought to engage current students with these resources in new ways, and engage other fields. This paper will present reflections from the teaching of a course on Immigration History, created by Dr. Mark Safstrom. The paper will explain how the archive has been used in the classroom, as well as nearby public history venues at Bishop Hill and Swedish historical sites in Chicago. It is anticipated that this proposal will be accompanied by related papers by Augustana colleagues, Prof. Adam Kaul (Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Welfare) and Prof. Brian Leech (History). It would be ideal for all three papers to be in the same panel of the 'What has heritage become?' stream. 

By:
Mark Safstrom
May 4, 2018, 10:45 am to 11:05 am
Hall: Optimist B Track: Heritage Type: 20 min
Contemporary Danish Literature and Carnal Nature-Cultures: Methodological Meditations on (Feminist) New Materialism and Literary Studies
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Contemporary Danish Literature and Carnal Nature-Cultures: Methodological Meditations on (Feminist) New Materialism and Literary Studies

In recent years, a new focus on the forces of corporality has surfaced in contemporary Danish literature. Exploring issues of menstruation, disease, racial visibility, abortion, and handicap, a wave of works is currently engaging the body as a recalcitrant materiel power, not only enrolled in the field of culture, but drawing on resources from the mighty domain of nature. While several literary scholars have noticed the emergence of this trend, few have acknowledged its methodological challenge to prevailing reading strategies within Danish literary criticism. Confronted by these explorations of what it feels like to live under the yoke of a nature-cultural force, this paper looks to the emerging field of (feminist) new materialism for tools to rethink established ways of reading 'the body' in literature (thereby following up on my mapping of contemporary literature in Den materielle drejning. Natur, teknologi og krop i (nyere) dansk litteratur (2016) (with Martin Gregersen)).

By:
Tobias Skiveren
May 4, 2018, 10:45 am to 11:05 am
Hall: Exploration Track: Unnatural Frontiers Type: 20 min
A Long Lost Jewish Voice: Rediscovering the Archives of Helsinki Yiddish Theatre
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A Long Lost Jewish Voice: Rediscovering the Archives of Helsinki Yiddish Theatre

The Finnish Jewish Archives became part of the National Archives of Finland only towards the end of the Millennium and it was opened to the public in 1998. Even though the archives is quite extensive when it comes to documentation of the Jewish community administration, there are a lot of gaps in regards to private archives, i.e. correspondence and diaries. Besides archiving documents, there has been hardly any systematic collection of oral data.In this paper I will discuss the rediscovering of an archive of a Yiddish theatre group that functioned in Helsinki between the World Wars and produced also works that depicted and satirized local Jewish life. I will demonstrate how these theatre manuscripts shed light on matters, especially during and after World War II and the Holocaust, that other, often more ‘official’ documents remain silent about.

By:
Simo Muir
May 4, 2018, 10:45 am to 11:05 am
Hall: Illumination Track: Nationhood in Finland Type: 20 min
Not available for scheduling Not available for scheduling Photographic frontiers. Documenting Arctic and Antarctic expeditions
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Photographic frontiers. Documenting Arctic and Antarctic expeditions

At the end of the 19th century, photographs came to play an ever more important part in the financing and marketing of polar expeditions. Postcards, slide lectures and illustrated stories in newspapers and magazines made Norwegian explorers like Fridtjof Nansen and Roald Amundsen known to potential financial backers as well as to public in general. The fact that Nansen and Amundsen became national and international heroes was, not least, due to the richly illustrated books they published about their expeditions. – The paper traces the changing role of photography in these books – from Nansen’s Paa ski over Grønland (1890) to Amundsen’s Sydpolen (1912). While the authors tell the story of their explorations at the Arctic and Antarctic frontier, the images tell a story about how the understanding of photography and its uses was transformed on the threshold of modern visual culture.

By:
Peter Larsen
May 4, 2018, 10:45 am to 11:05 am
Hall: Centennial C Track: Photography Type: 20 min
10:50 am
10:55 am
11:00 am
11:05 am Femininity, occult mediation and nature in Ragnhild Jølsen's Rikka Gan
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Femininity, occult mediation and nature in Ragnhild Jølsen's Rikka Gan

In this paper I will study relations between femininity, occult mediation and nature in Norwegian fin-de-siècle literature, with an emphasis on Ragnhild Jølsen’s novel Rikka Gan (1904). The action of the novel is taking place in the borderlands between nature and civilization, at the old manor Gan, where we meet the decendants of the first mistress of Gan. The protagonist, the strong and independent Rikka, falls victim to the villain of the novel as a result of her desire to reclaim the manor. My thesis is, that in this setting, the aftermath of the occult discourse of spiritualism and mesmerism of the nineteenth century mixed with folklore and gothic elements, becomes a powerful backdrop for a problematization of a new, more independent femininity initiated by the Modern Breakthrough.

By:
Gerd Karin Omdal
May 4, 2018, 11:05 am to 11:25 am
Hall: Centennial AB Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Memory and Media in the Films of Joachim Trier
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Memory and Media in the Films of Joachim Trier

In recent years, Joachim Trier has emerged as one of the most important and internationally recognized Nordic filmmakers. Along with his writing partner, Eskil Vogt, Trier has crafted films that are centered on moments of flux and crisis, moments in which personal and collective memories are invoked and interrogated. This paper will examine how the films of Joachim Trier—with particular reference to Oslo 31. august (2011) and Louder Than Bombs (2015)—connect such moments of crisis with what Astrid Erll has called 'media of memory' (Memory in Culture, 2011, p. 121). These films depict the ways in which personal and collective memory is mediated both by representational media such as photography and film as well as by more immersive environments such as the modern city.

By:
Benjamin Bigelow
May 4, 2018, 11:05 am to 11:25 am
Hall: Legacy A Track: Crises of Memory Type: 20 min
Broken or Whole? The Condition of Migration Period Gold Bracteates
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Broken or Whole? The Condition of Migration Period Gold Bracteates

Many of the over one thousand extant Scandinavian Migration Period gold bracteate pendants of the fifth and sixth centuries are marred in one way or another, showing evidence of destruction before or after they were deposited. Suspension loops may be torn or missing entirely, the gold disks may be bent, punctured, or fragmentary, and decoration including wire edge rims and repoussé soldered additions may be pulled loose, mutilated, or lost. Bracteates discovered through avocational metal-detecting are especially likely to be damaged because they have been subject to post-depositional disturbances, unlike examples carefully placed on the chest of a deceased elite woman buried in a grave and lying undisturbed until excavated archaeologically. Jewelry that was dropped may have been smashed inadvertently either soon after loss or much later. I will discuss a scientific method that may allow us to analyze whether breakage was due to gradual metal fatigue or violence.

By:
Nancy L. Wicker
May 4, 2018, 11:05 am to 11:25 am
Hall: Legacy B Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Physical and Mental Illness in Contemporary Scandinavian Poetry
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Physical and Mental Illness in Contemporary Scandinavian Poetry

The aim of the paper is to discuss the significant occurrence of physical and mental illness in contemporary Scandinavian poetry. In contemporary poetry, we have a different kind of poetic subjects than in classical modernist poetry. This has at least three reasons. Firstly, the modernist poetic subject has usually no name, no social position and no specific location in time and space. Secondly, this subject has an unprecedented 'ideal' body and soul that constitutes a center of the poetic univers. Thirdly, the subject has no physical or mental defects or diseases. The paper wishes to discuss the diversity between on the one hand the theory of the classical modernist poetry and on the other hand contemporary poetry. I will investigate the phenomenon in a number of contemporary Scandinavian poetic works.

By:
Peter Stein Larsen
May 4, 2018, 11:05 am to 11:25 am
Hall: Optimist A Track: Trauma Fictions Type: 20 min
The Last Journey
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The Last Journey

By choosing their final resting place, immigrants often have the chance to become the family's first forefather in the country, or they can make the desicion to link their family to their old chain of ancestors. It has been argued that the desired burial location even reveals - in the same way as language skills, employment and education - how well the person has been integrated in the new country. For someone born in Finland and who is probably going to die there, too, it is natural to think of the final resting place in Finland, but how about a person, who has left her or his country of birth: where to be buried when the time comes? In my paper I will examine the postmortal imaginery of transnational belonging with the aid of interviews conducted among Finnish immigrants in Sweden in the 1970s.

By:
Hanna Kyllikki Snellman
May 4, 2018, 11:05 am to 11:25 am
Hall: Optimist B Track: Heritage Type: 20 min
Crossing Frontiers: A Main Strategy in Stina Aronson’s Novel Hitom himlen (1946)
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Crossing Frontiers: A Main Strategy in Stina Aronson’s Novel Hitom himlen (1946)

Swedish writer Stina Aronson is most known for Hitom himlen (1946), a novel depicting an earthbound life on the Arctic frontier of industrialized Sweden. This specific landscape, where human existence is subjected to a harsh but divine nature, appears central to all of Aronson’s later prose (1946-1952). Consequently, the reception has largely labeled Aronson as 'provincalist'. Recent research has questioned this image by acknowledging the modernist qualities of Aronson’s later works. Due to the combination of 'unmodern' content and modernist form, Aronson’s 'wilderness writing' has proved hard to categorize within a literary history narrative. I will, however, argue that this idiosyncratic feature is one of its greatest strengths, sharpening our attention towards the particular world described, as well as the language constituting its unique expression. This is a defining characteristic of Aronson’s oeuvre, where the borders of human existence, literary representation, imaginary language and genre are constantly questioned and crossed.

By:
Beatrice M. G. Reed
May 4, 2018, 11:05 am to 11:25 am
Hall: Exploration Track: Unnatural Frontiers Type: 20 min
Inclusion and Exclusion – The Finnish Roma and the Category of Finnish Folklore
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Inclusion and Exclusion – The Finnish Roma and the Category of Finnish Folklore

My paper relates to the ongoing discussion in folklore studies and archival studies about archives as wielders of power, and about the position of minorities in the archival policies of nationally oriented archives. I will look at the folklore collections in the archives of the Finnish Literature Society (SKS) from the point of view of the borders of Finnishness, with particular attention to archival materials on the Finnish Roma in the 19th and early 20th centuries. I will show that when the material told by the Roma informant was congruent with the form and content of ‘Finnish folklore’, it was included in the collection as ‘Finnish folklore’. Nevertheless, the tradition native to Roma was considered culturally alien, non-Finnish, even though Roma had had a home and a life in Finland for centuries.

By:
Kati Mikkola
May 4, 2018, 11:05 am to 11:25 am
Hall: Illumination Track: Nationhood in Finland Type: 20 min
Inspiriting or Despiriting? Henry Parland's Recalcitrant Photographic Things
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Inspiriting or Despiriting? Henry Parland's Recalcitrant Photographic Things

As the eponymous protagonist in Sönder (1932) develops a photograph (framkalla film) of his romantic interest Ami, the author Henry Parland aesthetically situates the dark room as a séance, with a Neo-Spiritualist conjuring a ghost (framkalla spöken). This paper combines a New Historicist approach to the late 19th and early 20th Century spirit-photography cults and a strong metonymic reading of the recurring Zeiss-Ikon camera in order to explore latent textual questions of material ontology. Sönder promises a mechanical reproduction of a lost spirit in the medium of film, but the protagonist and reader alike are instead forced to receive a recalcitrant Thing, as per Jane Bennett, that has an agency and life of its own. In so doing, Parland disenchants historical and contemporary mysticism surrounding camera lenses, but focalizes on the potential non-human spirit in the mechanical optic.

By:
Adam J. Carl
May 4, 2018, 11:05 am to 11:25 am
Hall: Centennial C Track: Photography Type: 20 min
11:10 am
11:15 am
11:20 am
11:25 am Solstad’s Telemark and Mendelssohn’s Cosmopolitan Map: Literary Explorations in Genealogy and Geography
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Solstad’s Telemark and Mendelssohn’s Cosmopolitan Map: Literary Explorations in Genealogy and Geography

This paper proposes a comparative analysis of Dag Solstad’s Det uoppløselige episke element i Telemark i perioden 1591-1896 (2013) and Diane Meur’s La carte des Mendelssohn (2015), examining how different articulations of genealogy and geography are used to challenge the traditional genre of the family novel. Solstad pushes the concept of the novel to its limits, by following the logic of the genealogical tree rather than that of a plot. Meur performs a dissolution of the concept of genealogy and turns the story of her own literary research project – the creation of a map of the Mendelssohn clan – into the very topic of the novel. I argue that geographical place and space have distinctive functions in these literary projects, whether the peripheral ‘frontier’ of Telemark or the cosmopolitan space of the Mendelssohns, structuring the genealogical exploration in the former, while remedying the sense of rhizomatic dissolution in the latter.

By:
Marius Warholm Haugen
May 4, 2018, 11:25 am to 11:45 am
Hall: Centennial AB Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Navigating Memory in the Nordic Region with Constant Reference to Kierkegaard
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Navigating Memory in the Nordic Region with Constant Reference to Kierkegaard

The purpose of this paper is twofold. The first is to function as an introduction to the proposed panel on 'Crises in Memory in Nordic Literature and Film' and to briefly explore the status of a memory studies involving the Nordic region today. With the Memory Studies Association holding its second conference ever in Copenhagen in December 2017 and the fact that at least three of panels at this conference are dedicated to related topics, one might ask about the status of memory studies in the Nordic region. This part of the paper will also survey some major trends within Nordic memory studies. The second purpose of this paper is to connect the question of a Nordic memory studies to my own research interests in Søren Kierkegaard, modernity and the arrival of what I would call memory in crisis. Using Kierkegaard’s Either/Or as a foundational incursion into the role and function of memory in the modern period, this part of my paper aims to examine Kierkegaard’s work as an early and important exploration of memory as a counterbalance to a Danish Hegelian inspired philosophy of history. This counteractive potential of memory in Kierkegaard’s work repeats current debates about the similarities and differences between memory and history. 

By:
Nate Kramer
May 4, 2018, 11:25 am to 11:45 am
Hall: Legacy A Track: Crises of Memory Type: 20 min
Vikings, History, and the Search for Ourselves
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Vikings, History, and the Search for Ourselves

I recently created a new class on the Viking Age.  As a medievalist historian, I have an interest in teaching Viking history, but it was the fascination expressed repeatedly by my students that became my motivation.  Historians know issues with sources can make Vikings difficult to pin down, yet for my students they had a very definite presence.  When asked for their conception of a Viking at the beginning of the class, an incredibly unified and specific picture emerged.  It begged two questions: what is the allure of these people who lived so long ago, about whom we know relatively little and yet who my students see so very clearly?  How is this historical disconnect possible?  I began to think more about how we engage with the past, how we tend to remake it in our own image, and why.  What followed were important lessons about history and human nature.

By:
Terri Barnes
May 4, 2018, 11:25 am to 11:45 am
Hall: Legacy B Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Trauma and creativity in Johan Harstad’s Max, Mischa & Tetoffensiven (2015)
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Trauma and creativity in Johan Harstad’s Max, Mischa & Tetoffensiven (2015)

Harstad's authorship is often preoccupied with apocalyptic visions and traumas of war. Both his novels Hässelby. Disassembly has begun (2007) and Darlah. 172 hours on the Moon (2008) end in the annihilation of human life on earth. In the first, destruction is a metaphoric disassembly of the idea of social democracy (Waage 2015:252). In the latter human extinction is to be read as a critique of a society of adults that has no interest in the wellbeing of coming generations.In his play Osv. (2010) Harstad is discussing past and violent 'krigshandlinger og konfliktsoner' (Langås 2015:146). Protagonists in Osv. explore the impact such conflicts have on individuals. The novel Max, Mischa & Tetoffensiven (2015) confronts us with two major traumas of violent conflicts deeply embedded into the Western - and American - psyche: The Vietnam war and 9/11.Thus, in my presentation I want to look into three different ascpects of trauma as seen in Max, Mischa & Tetoffensiven. First, there is the experience of the individual trauma. Second, there is a society engaging with a specific trauma, and last, there is the question of how traumas - be it individual or collective - transform into artistic expression. The analysis will focus on the two characters Owen - the Vietnam-veteran struggling to come to terms with his experience from the war, and Mischa - the artist that has made a career out of using ready-made-objects from the Vietnam War and debris from the fallen twin towers. Such a creative approach also resonates with Harstad's methodological oevre as he constantly uses, rescycles and transforms expressions from popular culture about the Vietnam War, constantly confronting the questions of trauma through new approaches.

By:
Lars Rune Waage
May 4, 2018, 11:25 am to 11:45 am
Hall: Optimist A Track: Trauma Fictions Type: 20 min
Vlogging and blogging in Toronto and Helsinki: From Imagined to real communities
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Vlogging and blogging in Toronto and Helsinki: From Imagined to real communities

The use of social media in language pedagogy shifts learning from accessing and sharing information to designing communities of inquiry where participants are actively engaged in deep and meaningful learning (Vaughan 2013). Social media applications using the Internet capitalize on its greatest asset: bringing people together in communities where participants – both students and teachers - can interact and collaborate on meaningful activities. (Vaughan 2013, see also 'Imagined community' Andersson 2006) Our paper we will bring along pedagogical insights and discourse from an innovative blended learning project 'Vlogging and blogging in Toronto and Helsinki' where two parallel Elementary Finnish classes from University of Toronto in Canada and University of Arts in Helsinki in Finland have been collaborating. Because vlogging has not been used much in our field, this innovation is on the frontier of new groundbreaking and innovative language pedagogy. This project is financed by Finnish National Agency for Education (EDUFI). Anderson, Benedict (2006): Imagined Communities. London & New York: Verso. Vaughan, Norman. D. (2008): The use of wikis and weblogs to support deep approaches to learning. The University College of Fraser Valley Research Review, Volume 1, Issue 3, 47-60.

By:
Anu Muhonen
May 4, 2018, 11:25 am to 11:45 am
Hall: Optimist B Track: Language Pedagogy Type: 20 min
The Literary Forest in works of August Strindberg
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The Literary Forest in works of August Strindberg

In the forests in works of August Strindberg the main signifier is darkness. Darkness seems to mean something different in different periods of Strindberg’s authorship. After the Inferno crisis in the eighteen nineties, as the author was focusing on the single individual’s struggle more than delivering social critique, the dark forest becomes ambiguous. The darkness in the forest may represent something evil as well as being a place for retreat where miracles do happen or where the character finds a guiding star or person. In this period Strindberg was preoccupied with inwards care for the salvation of the soul and influenced by a religious esoteric ideology that might explain the ambiguity described concerning good and evil forests – forests and darkness has in an esoteric worldview an ambiguous status where it’s pointed out that you have to go through the miseries to get to the better place.

By:
Astrid Inger Elisabet Regnell
May 4, 2018, 11:25 am to 11:45 am
Hall: Exploration Track: Unnatural Frontiers Type: 20 min
Between religious identity and national identity: finding belonging and expressing engagement for Pentecostal Finnish Roma in Lutheran Finland
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Between religious identity and national identity: finding belonging and expressing engagement for Pentecostal Finnish Roma in Lutheran Finland

Based on extensive ethnographic fieldwork, this paper focuses on the present-day belonging of one of Finland’s national minorities, the Finnish Roma, to a minority religious movement in the country, Pentecostalism. On the one hand, in what appears to be a social mobility ladder, Pentecostalism provides Roma the opportunity for enhanced participation in the nation state and engagement in humanitarian social work, enhancing also their relationship with majority Finns. On the other, Lutheranism continues to be a symbol of Finnish belonging and a symbol of unity across the Nordic countries.  In the case of this historically marginalized group, this paper explores the complex relationship between national belonging, identity and social engagement. The paper will, therefore, explore the role of religious participation in shaping specific ideas (and ideals) of the nation as well as the meaning and shape of Finnishness in present day Europe.

By:
Raluca Bianca Roman
May 4, 2018, 11:25 am to 11:45 am
Hall: Illumination Track: Nationhood in Finland Type: 20 min
The senses of Norwegian modernism 1890-1970
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The senses of Norwegian modernism 1890-1970

Modernism has often been described as a purely formal issue, like a turn to a 'pure' art' or l'art pour l'art-aesthetics. This is certainly true in many cases, but the history of Norwegian modernism could also be examined from a media-historical perspective.  The paper will explore the dialectics of Norwegian modernism and its medial context, from the 1890s to the 1970s. The paper´s thesis is that Norwegian modernism is not about imitating avant-garde artists from Europe, but about a technologically mediated crisis of the senses. The emergence of photography, radio and film has changed the way we perceive the world and has continuously been an inspiration for Norwegian modernist writers. The paper will explore how our experiences of the world are shaped by our surrounding technologies: Poems by Sigbjørn Obstfelder, Rolf Jacobsen and Paal Brekke will provide the examples.

By:
John Brumo
May 4, 2018, 11:25 am to 11:45 am
Hall: Centennial C Track: Photography Type: 20 min
11:30 am
11:35 am
11:40 am
11:45 am Question and Answer
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Question and Answer

Session Chair: Gustaf Marcus

By:
Gustaf Marcus
May 4, 2018, 11:45 am to 12:15 pm
Hall: Centennial AB Track: General Papers
Temporal overlapping in Scandinavian film: From Ingmar Bergman to Joachim Trier
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Temporal overlapping in Scandinavian film: From Ingmar Bergman to Joachim Trier

The technique of temporal overlapping, where a portion of time is repeated in a succeeding shot, has received attention in studies in early cinema and the avant-garde films of the 1920s. Yet we find many examples of temporal reiteration, both similar to and different from the early instances, throughout the history of film. Some famous examples include films such as Citizen Kane (1941), Sunset Boulevard (1950), Last Year at Marienbad (1961), and Pulp Fiction (1994). I will here discuss the use of temporal overlapping in Bergman’s Persona (1966) and Trier’s Louder Than Bombs (2015) in a larger context, and, furthermore, draw attention to how the use of this technique creates meaning in the two films. Whereas Bergman used the device in Persona to explore the frontiers of cinematic modernism, temporal overlapping in Louder Than Bombs is used to explore the complex and painful relationship between a father and a son. 

By:
Cato Wittusen
May 4, 2018, 11:45 am to 12:05 pm
Hall: Legacy A Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Set in stone: Religious accommodation and the uses of the past in Anglo-Scandinavian stone sculpture
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Set in stone: Religious accommodation and the uses of the past in Anglo-Scandinavian stone sculpture

The Gosforth Cross is a high-cross sculpture from the 10th century located in the northwest of England, a region that received Hiberno-Norse settlements in the ninth century. Its iconographic repertoire mixes the Anglo-Saxon sculptural tradition with motifs from different pagan pantheons, a fusion that evidences intericonicity or visual intertextuality, in an intricate  juxtaposition between elements from Norse, Celtic, and Christian mythologies. The east face depicts the crucifixion of Christ, while the other faces contain several scenes from the Nordic axial myth of Ragnarök. The 'pagan iconography of Christian ideas' is a powerful visual register of the rhetoric used in the Conversion of Celtic and Norse peoples in medieval Britain – a long intellectual process of cultural and religious accommodation (KOPAR, 2013). In this presentation, our aim is to explore the use of norse mythology, of heritage, and material culture in this process of re signification and transculturality.

By:
Poliana de Oliveira Gomes
May 4, 2018, 11:45 am to 12:05 pm
Hall: Legacy B Track: Heritage Type: 20 min
Retreating into the Inner Frontier
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Retreating into the Inner Frontier

In my paper, I will address the theme of withdrawal in Per Petterson’s novel Ut og stjæle hester (2003), focusing on the various strategies employed by the first-person narrator, Trond Sander, as he attempts to isolate himself from others, physically as well as emotionally. By interrogating the manner in which this decision is presented in the narrative, I explore how best to understand the many expressions of his desire to be alone, especially when considered in light of two frequently repeated utterances that come to function almost as mantras in the novel: 'You decide for yourself when it will hurt' and 'I have been lucky'. In doing so, I will discuss to what degree should these utterances be read as mere statements of fact, and to what degree they should be read as symptoms of the narrator’s ongoing endeavor to work through deep-seated personal traumas.

By:
Anders M. Gullestad
May 4, 2018, 11:45 am to 12:05 pm
Hall: Optimist A Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
The Cross: Cultural Differences and Conflicts Between Immigrant Americans
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The Cross: Cultural Differences and Conflicts Between Immigrant Americans

After my mother died, my sister and I established a memorial to her connected to Norway, her birthplace.  I had just spent a year there, and was impressed by the women’s needlework, so proposed a Hardanger cross to be given to a church in Illinois that we had supported for over fifty years.  It was accepted, and the cross was ordered from a woman I had met in Trondheim. However, the arrival of the cross instigated a disagreement that continued for some twenty years, involving three local priests and two bishops. They did not want the cross to be placed in the church, as agreed upon, and it was repeatedly removed and put into storage.  I finally contacted the head of the church in New York.  To this day, the issue has not yet been resolved. This so called disagreement has had a major effect on my life in various ways.  I became involved in church politics, locally and nationally, seeing a darker side of an institution that (I thought) I had known from childhood.  I also became involved in local politics—advocating for the elderly and immigrant groups in city and state legislatures in an attempt to prevent situations like this from occurring. In the process, I also realized the depth and strength of my relationship to my mother’s culture, and I continue to explore it as a means of healing through books, foods, and social connections like the ones I make with all of you.  For I am not just an American, but a Norwegian American.

By:
Patricia Marton
May 4, 2018, 11:45 am to 12:05 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Literary Forest Question and Answer
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Literary Forest Question and Answer

By:
Jenna M. Coughlin
May 4, 2018, 11:45 am to 12:15 pm
Hall: Exploration Track: Unnatural Frontiers
Carl Mustonen and the Finlandia Male Chorus of Detroit
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Carl Mustonen and the Finlandia Male Chorus of Detroit

From the late 1920s, Carl Mustonen was a central figure in Scandinavian choral singing in Detroit.  His papers at the Finnish American Historical Archive in Hancock, Michigan include music, programs, letters, and newspaper clippings documenting his long career.   In 1939, he incorporated the Finlandia Male Chorus of Detroit and served as its director until 1970. Simultaneously from 1964 to 1971 he directed the Arpi Swedish Male Chorus of Detroit, having been a member of the chorus prior to that time.  The FMCD served the Finnish American community by giving benefit concerts, leading concert tours to Finland, and sponsoring Finnish choruses to the United States.  It performed music by Finnish and international composers, with Finnish or English lyrics, in classical, folk and popular styles.  It was part of a network of Finnish and Scandinavian choruses throughout North America, which helped communities preserve their ethnic identities.

By:
Carl Rahkonen
May 4, 2018, 11:45 am to 12:05 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Photography Question and Answer
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Photography Question and Answer

Session Chair: John Brumo

By:
John Brumo
May 4, 2018, 11:45 am to 12:15 pm
Hall: Centennial C Track: Photography
11:50 am
11:55 am
12:00 pm
12:05 pm Crises of Memory
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Crises of Memory

Session Chair: Nate Kramer

By:
Nate Kramer
May 4, 2018, 12:05 pm to 12:15 pm
Hall: Legacy A Track: Crises of Memory
Question and Answer
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Question and Answer

Session Chair: Nancy L. Wicker

By:
Nancy L. Wicker
May 4, 2018, 12:05 pm to 12:15 pm
Hall: Legacy B Track: General Papers
Trauma Fictions Question and Answer
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Trauma Fictions Question and Answer

Session Chair: Lars Rune Waage

By:
Lars Rune Waage
May 4, 2018, 12:05 pm to 12:15 pm
Hall: Optimist A Track: Trauma Fictions
Heritage Question and Answer
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Heritage Question and Answer

Session Chair: Hanna K. Snellman

By:
Hanna Kyllikki Snellman
May 4, 2018, 12:05 pm to 12:15 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: Heritage
Nationhood in Finland Question and Answer
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Nationhood in Finland Question and Answer

In Europe, including Finland, recent migration and displacement have stimulated the vigorous debate on the politics of inclusion and on the historically rooted question of national belonging. Historically, the sense of belonging to a nation has often been “invented” by the majority or by the people in power. Folklore-collecting institutions, such as the Finnish Literature Society in the late nineteenth century, conceived of the so-called Finnish-speaking common people, that is, those individuals who performed physical labor for a living, either in agriculture, the logging industry, or skilled craftsmanship, as a single, homogeneous group in contrast to the upper stratum of society. Ethnic minorities, in particular, did not fit into the idea of a nation; given the nation-building interest of the collectors, their oral traditions and customs failed to arouse interest—and thus, for long, they were not documented and stored in the archives. Although ethnic minorities of Finland were living among and embedded in majority-dominated communities, their views were ignored or unheard. The idea of homogeneity thus concealed many frontiers that continued to exist in the collectivity of the nation. In that sense, we ask in our session, informed by the historical and sociological makings of the Finnish nation-state: How have minorities of Finland, such as the Roma or the Finnish Jewish, agreed with such understandings of national belonging and national identity? This panel focuses on subtle ways in which the Finnish minorities have been understood in the archives and vis-à-vis notions of nation and belonging, the often-negative stereotypes held by members of the majority and the cultural boundaries drawn by them. The panel thus discusses perspectives coming from minority populations themselves.

By:
Eija Stark
May 4, 2018, 12:05 pm to 12:15 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: Nationhood in Finland
12:10 pm
12:15 pm         ASTRA lunch time meeting   DANA lunch time meeting NorTANA lunch time meeting
12:20 pm          
12:25 pm          
12:30 pm          
12:35 pm          
12:40 pm          
12:45 pm          
12:50 pm          
12:55 pm          
1:00 pm          
1:05 pm          
1:10 pm          
1:15 pm          
1:20 pm          
1:25 pm          
1:30 pm          
1:35 pm          
1:40 pm          
1:45 pm          
1:50 pm          
1:55 pm          
2:00 pm The Enviable Swedish Sin: Sweden’s Influence on United States Sex Education, 1910-1960
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The Enviable Swedish Sin: Sweden’s Influence on United States Sex Education, 1910-1960

This paper explores the influence Sweden had on United States sex education, with a focus on how the U.S. used Sweden as a model in crafting its own sex education curricula. I contend that the two countries, initially, worked together to build up their respective sex education programs. By the 1940s, however, the U.S. began to turn to Sweden to learn how to implement birth control and education programs. I argue that Sweden has, historically, played a larger role in U.S. sex education policy than previously examined, and that the notion of a 'Swedish sin' was not, initially, a derogatory term. I focus on material and archives in both nations, particularly from two organizations that advocated sex instruction, the American Social Hygiene Association (ASHA) and the Swedish Association for Sexuality Education (RFSU, Riksförbundet för sexuell upplysning), to show the transnational relationship between the two countries.

By:
Saniya Lee Ghanoui
May 4, 2018, 2:00 pm to 2:20 pm
Hall: Centennial AB Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Border Affects: Emotions and nationalisms in mid-nineteenth-century Nordic literature
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Border Affects: Emotions and nationalisms in mid-nineteenth-century Nordic literature

Nineteenth-century literature created national peoples out of regional and social diversity. In Swedish, Norwegian, and Finnish mid-nineteenth-century literature, borders – national and regional – were loaded with emotions. On the one hand, borderlands were portrayed as perilous spaces where wild nature and failing law-enforcement engender mortal danger. On the other hand, borders represent the love and satisfaction of needs that liberal citizenship promised. The new imagined communities also drew new emotional boundaries for inclusion in society. Sara Ahmed’s concept 'affective economies' will be used to analyse how emotions constituted mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion in literature. The nineteenth-century moral citizenship was based on affective economies that were partly different from our own time. Thus, in this paper I will address the issue of how new inner and outer borders were established in affect.

By:
Anna Bohlin
May 4, 2018, 2:00 pm to 2:20 pm
Hall: Legacy A Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Origins of the Saami: Recent Linguistic and Genetic Research
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Origins of the Saami: Recent Linguistic and Genetic Research

Ideas about the origin of the Saami have been numerous and literally all over the map for the past two centuries. Had they been in Scandinavia many millennia or were they relative newcomers? Thanks especially to careful linguistic analysis and recent genetic research it is now possible to specify convincingly in broad outline where the Saami come from and the nature of the languages they speak. Yes, some Saami ancestors have been in Scandinavia for thousands of years. Today’s Saami languages though are not quite that old: they belong to the Finno-Ugric family of languages, but they also show traces of the languages spoken before the Proto-Saami (Finno-Ugric) speakers arrived in Scandinavia some 2000 years ago.

By:
John Weinstock
May 4, 2018, 2:00 pm to 2:20 pm
Hall: Legacy B Track: Saami Type: 20 min
Happy Heterosexual Endings: The Swedish Gender Equality Ideal and Literary Representations of Mothers Who Leave
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Happy Heterosexual Endings: The Swedish Gender Equality Ideal and Literary Representations of Mothers Who Leave

The Nordic countries, and Sweden in particular, are often seen as being at the frontier of gender equality. Sweden has even been described as governed by a gender equality norm, visible for instance in a family politics which has made it possible for both women and men to combine family and professional lives. At the same time, in twenty-first century Swedish literature we find a surprising number of mothers who leave their families. In this paper I will discuss two of these novels, which depict mothers who leave their families because of gender inequality with a desire to improve their situations: Emma Hamberg’s Brunstkalendern (2007) and Carin Hjulström’s Irene Panik (2014). I will analyze the gender equality ideal that is (re)produced in these novels and how it is linked to ideas of Nordic exceptionalism and shaped through processes of othering.

By:
Jenny Bjorklund
May 4, 2018, 2:00 pm to 2:20 pm
Hall: Optimist A Track: Gender Type: 20 min
The rhetorics of rupture in Brandes' introductory lecture
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The rhetorics of rupture in Brandes' introductory lecture

The history of Georg Brandes’ introductory lecture to Main Currents in 19th century Literature is the story of an university lecture that was to turn the pages of Scandinavian literary history. Brandes’ lecture made a public scandal not only because of its radical ideas of secularism and the emancipation of women but also because its rhetorical form and metaphorical language of rupture.  With the metaphor 'Main Currents' Brandes’ positioned himself as an advocate of an irreversible Hegelian logic and telos in the history of ideas and an apostle for a future modernization of Scandinavian culture. In a genre perspective Brandes’ lecture may be read as an avant-garde manifesto in the tradition of Marx’ and Engels’ Communist Manifesto and other 19th century revolutionary texts. In my paper I want to examine the revolutionary rhetorics of Brandes’ lecture as a way to explain its shocking impact in the context of 1871/1872 Denmark.

By:
Torben Jelsbak
May 4, 2018, 2:00 pm to 2:20 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: Reintroducing Brandes Type: 20 min
Medieval Texts in the Eco-Classroom: Models for Continuity and Change
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Medieval Texts in the Eco-Classroom: Models for Continuity and Change

Over the past decade, a plethora of studies on wilderness and ecology have been published in the sphere of modern Nordic Studies. With an increasing amount of material to work with, Ecocriticism is slowly becoming a staple topic in the classroom. The application of ecotheory to medieval texts, however, has been less popular, which is reflected in the customary focus on modern texts in the eco-classroom. Images of wilderness in pre-modern texts, in fact, present an opportunity to discuss how images of nature have changed in space and time. With the endeavor to encourage such discussion in the classroom, this paper will present a model for incorporating medieval texts into modern syllabi. The focus will be on an eco-themed course taught at UC Berkeley entitled 'The Forest and its Manifestations in Literature and Media.'

By:
Tiffany Nicole White
May 4, 2018, 2:00 pm to 2:10 pm
Hall: Exploration Track: Unnatural Frontiers Type: Roundtable
This Is What It’s Like to Be a Negro': The Swedish Photo Magazine Se Deals with American Racism, 1963-64
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This Is What It’s Like to Be a Negro': The Swedish Photo Magazine Se Deals with American Racism, 1963-64

Se was a Swedish magazine modeled on Life in the United States that was published between 1938 and 1981. By the early 1960s, it had developed into a men’s publication that mixed photography with sports, (mild) sex, social issues and outspoken editorials. This study of all issues of Se in 1963 and 1964 discusses how editor Rune Moberg took an interest in racism and civil rights in America and approached that topic in three ways. First, some stories dealt with racism head on, telling readers about discrimination, as well as African-American resistance. Second, capitalizing on reader interest in boxing, Se used the experience of black fighters such as Floyd Patterson, Sonny Liston and Cassius Clay/Muhammad Ali to personalize the black experience. Third, Moberg frequently made a point of stressing that racism was not confined to America, running stories about prejudice against blacks and other minorities in Sweden.

By:
Ulf Jonas Bjork
May 4, 2018, 2:00 pm to 2:20 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: African Americans in Sweden Type: 20 min
Nikolai Astrup and his Scandinavian Artist Network
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Nikolai Astrup and his Scandinavian Artist Network

The Norwegian painter Nikolai Astrup (1880-1928) has suffered under the labels of 'the national' and 'the local' in Norwegian art history, when it is obvious that on his journeys through Scandinavia and Europe he interacted with contemporary artists and intellectuals and that he had a great interest in international art. In the previous research one has overlooked the fact that Astrup appreciated the abstraction in Henri Rousseau’s works and that he eagerly read the theories of Wassiliy Kandinsky on the spiritual in art. I will argue that Astrup learned about Kandinsky and Rousseau via friends he made on visits to Sweden and Denmark and through the Scandinavian environment in Paris in the early 1900s.

By:
Kesia Eidesen
May 4, 2018, 2:00 pm to 2:20 pm
Hall: Centennial C Track: Art Type: 20 min
2:05 pm
2:10 pm Teaching the Nordic Anthropocene: The Future Library
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Teaching the Nordic Anthropocene: The Future Library

The term 'Anthropocene' has recently gained traction as a way of reframing the human relationship to nature in the age of climate change. Although today’s students have been familiar with contemporary environmental problems since childhood, they often lack the critical language to discuss a 'nature' remade by human influence. In order to understand contemporary responses to the Anthropocene, as well as to envision the future of human relationships to nature, students need to understand the Anthropocene and its narratives. In the Nordic context, projects such as The Future Library by Scottish artist Katie Paterson are predicated upon Nordic social and environmental conditions, suggesting the unique and important role the Nordic region plays in our current era. In this presentation, I will offer strategies for introducing students to the Anthropocene, demonstrating how Nordic examples can be effectively used to encourage students to think critically about the relationship between nature and culture.

By:
Jenna M. Coughlin
May 4, 2018, 2:10 pm to 2:20 pm
Hall: Exploration Track: Unnatural Frontiers Type: Roundtable
2:15 pm
2:20 pm Science and State at the Swedish Bureau of Mines, 1750-1820
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Science and State at the Swedish Bureau of Mines, 1750-1820

Between 1750 and 1830, Swedish chemists and mineralogists generated over a dozen element discoveries, over a third of the worldwide total for these years. These researchers all worked within a small but inordinately prominent domestic scientific community focused on the mining industry, and most received support, training, or jobs within the state Bureau of Mines (Bergskollegium). Far more than a trade council, the Bureau effectively provided the entire government administration in mining regions in addition to industry regulation and support for scientific research. This paper examines the roles that chemists and mineralogists played within the Bureau of Mines, and the roles the Bureau played in their lives and careers in turn. Through this lens, I further demonstrate the large and influential sphere the Bureau occupied within eighteenth-century Swedish politics and political economy. This paper presents results and progress of research funded by the 2017 Haugen Memorial Scholarship.

By:
Charlotte Amalie Abney Salomon
May 4, 2018, 2:20 pm to 2:40 pm
Hall: Centennial AB Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Dialectal features in Gustaf Fröding's standard Swedish poetry
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Dialectal features in Gustaf Fröding's standard Swedish poetry

The Swedish poet Gustaf Fröding mainly wrote in Standard Swedish, but in around 30 poems he uses dialectal features as stylistic markers. Most of the poems contain a handful of these markers, and through them Fröding creates different effects, such as comical and realistic impressions. The focus of this paper is on distinguishing dialectal features from Standard Swedish and determining their dialectal authenticity. Attention is paid to geographical distribution to determine whether these features occur generally in Swedish dialects or are limited to Värmland. In this context it is also important to determine which of these features are representative of Fröding’s idiolect. Frequency, i.e. the extent to which these dialectal features occur and how frequently they follow on each other, and etymology are also considered. The paper also describes the changes that Fröding made to his poems in the form of additions and reductions of dialectical elements.

By:
Björn Bihl
May 4, 2018, 2:20 pm to 2:40 pm
Hall: Legacy A Track: Linguistics Type: 20 min
Sámi Literature beyond Sápmi
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Sámi Literature beyond Sápmi

Several Sámi authors today address issues of globalization in their works. Jovnna-Ánde Vest, Inger-Mari Aikio, Kirste Paltto, and Niillas Holmberg have all either discussed the effects that global culture, ideas, and patterns of consumption have had on the Sámi and Sápmi, or explored the experience of being Sámi in a world with increased global travel and interconnectedness. In these works, globalization often heightens tensions between generations or creates dilemmas for characters caught between their desire to follow global possibilities and their ties to the local community, while at the same time these works show the role that globalization plays in fostering bonds across the world that can resist colonial pressures and give voice to indigenous peoples. In this paper, I will begin to examine how recent works of Sámi literature negotiate this conflict between the perceived advantages and disadvantages of globalization for the Sámi community today.

By:
John Stephen Prusynski
May 4, 2018, 2:20 pm to 2:40 pm
Hall: Legacy B Track: Saami Type: 20 min
They warned me the neighbours were queer...this must be pappa Moomin': Examining Queer Communities in the Moomin Comic Strips
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They warned me the neighbours were queer...this must be pappa Moomin': Examining Queer Communities in the Moomin Comic Strips

The beloved Moomin characters of the Finland-Swedish author Tove Jansson appear not only in books (not to mention television and various products) but also in comic strips. The main difference between the books and the comics were their target audience – while the books were mainly marketed for children, the comic strips (1954-1975) were published in newspapers all over the world and were aimed at adult readers. The comic strips comprise of the same kinds of quirky characters that the books do, but rely more on wild adventures and absurd events than the books. Drawing on queer theory I examine how different kinds of communities are formed and exist in the Moomin comic strip stories. I am interested to see how they represent alternative, or queer, ways of being in the world, and what they say about gender, sexuality, family, and community in general.

By:
Veronica Tank
May 4, 2018, 2:20 pm to 2:40 pm
Hall: Optimist A Track: Gender Type: 20 min
On the Impact and Transmission of Georg Brandes’ Opening Lecture in Germany
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On the Impact and Transmission of Georg Brandes’ Opening Lecture in Germany

The knowledge of Brandes in the (contemporary) German-speaking world is undeniable, cf. the nearly 40 obituaries in German alone. Nevertheless, also in the German-speaking countries, Brandes throughout his life and work has been a highly controversial figure. The paper will focus on the impact and complex transmission of his opening lecture in Germany. This lecture implied a radical change of the literary mindset of the time with consequences also for the perception of German literature. Crucial for Brandes’ introduction to the German market and the early reception was his German translator, Adolf Strodtmann, who also wrote a book on The Intellectual Life in Denmark (1873), very much in Brandes’ spirit. Also in his foreword to the first volume of the Main Currents, Strodtmann modelled the image of Brandes, a glorification really, that actually wasn’t that relevant to the contemporary German literary market, but nevertheless shaped Brandes’ reception by the critics.

By:
Monica Wenusch
May 4, 2018, 2:20 pm to 2:40 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: Reintroducing Brandes Type: 20 min
Teaching Ecocriticism with Early Modern Scandinavian Texts
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Teaching Ecocriticism with Early Modern Scandinavian Texts

Early modern Scandinavian literature and art teems with material conducive to courses on ecocriticism. The articulation of Cartesian dualism, the invention and application of scientific taxonomy, the development of pastoral literature, the efforts of cameralists to capitalize on indigenous flora and fauna—to take some examples—inform much literature and art in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. A handout of translated early modern works and supplementary materials will be circulated. I will suggest how instructors could engage undergraduate students with texts by canonical authors (e.g., Holberg, Linnaeus, Kingo, Bellman) in ways that highlight their discourses about nature. I will also offer an overview of some modern Scandinavian literary texts (e.g., Kerstin Ekman’s Rövarna i Skuleskogen) that complement period materials. I will conclude by offering reflections on the difficulties and advantages of teaching early modern Scandinavian texts in a course on ecocriticism before posing several open-ended questions for roundtable discussion.

By:
Zachary Harrison Blinkinsop
May 4, 2018, 2:20 pm to 2:30 pm
Hall: Exploration Track: Unnatural Frontiers Type: Roundtable
The Activist Journalism in Sweden of American Ex-Pat Sherman Adams From the 1960s to the 1980s
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The Activist Journalism in Sweden of American Ex-Pat Sherman Adams From the 1960s to the 1980s

Sherman Adams produced over 70 signed articles for the Swedish press in the three decades of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. Most of them dealt with race relations in the United States, although Adams regularly also commented on Swedish society. Taken as a whole, this corpus provides a review of major incidents and issues in the US civil rights movement and a way to chart the activism of Adams in Sweden during these years. An overview will focus on some of the best known causes Adams concerned himself with as well as a consideration of the breadth and major characteristics of Adams’s journalistic writing.

By:
Jay Lutz
May 4, 2018, 2:20 pm to 2:40 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: African Americans in Sweden Type: 20 min
Edvard Munch’s Art as a Comic Book
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Edvard Munch’s Art as a Comic Book

In this paper, I look at Munch’s art through the semiotics of comics. Steffen Kverneland, in his comic book Munch (2013), claims that Munch is like a proto-comic-book artist in the way he makes caricatures and satirical drawings. In her book Emma & Edvard (2017), Mieke Bal investigates the cinematic qualities in Munch’s art, presenting his paintings as a storyboard. I am inspired by Kverneland to call this a comic-like quality. Munch’s 'livsfrise' could also be seen as having a comic-like narrativity or seriality. His art has been described as 'visual thinking'. What if we take this claim literally? I believe it is possibly to use the concepts of thought bubbles and speech balloons as art historical tools for making visible certain features in Munch’s works that relate to his use of thinking characters and his interest in dreams, visions and memory.

By:
Oystein Sjaastad
May 4, 2018, 2:20 pm to 2:40 pm
Hall: Centennial C Track: Art Type: 20 min
2:25 pm
2:30 pm Roundtable: (Un)Natural Frontiers--EcoCriticism in the Classroom
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Roundtable: (Un)Natural Frontiers--EcoCriticism in the Classroom

By:
Jenna M. Coughlin, Tiffany Nicole White, Zachary Harrison Blinkinsop
May 4, 2018, 2:30 pm to 3:30 pm
Hall: Exploration Track: Unnatural Frontiers Type: Roundtable
2:35 pm
2:40 pm ‘Valentino-Taylorism’ and the Intellectual Roots of the Swedish Model of Labor Peace
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‘Valentino-Taylorism’ and the Intellectual Roots of the Swedish Model of Labor Peace

A truly unique feature of Swedish society during the decades when it attracted a disproportionate amount of attention in the surrounding world – from the early 1930s through the late 1970s – was the 'Great Labor Peace Apparatus' (as one Swedologist dubbed it in 1968). The 'Swedish Model' in this sense of the term was established by an agreement between the blue-collar trade unions’ and the employers’ national federations in 1938. The land of costly strikes and lockouts suddenly became the world’s major proof of industrial efficiency’s compatibility with collective bargaining. The Saltsjöbaden peace treaty’s driving forces were complex. But one of its conditions was a background that provided the mode of thought applied. This paper tracks these intellectual roots to the USA in the mid-1910s, when orthodox Taylorism’s radical demand of change within industrial life merged with ideas of industrial democracy based on independent trade unions and collective bargaining.

By:
David Östlund
May 4, 2018, 2:40 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: Centennial AB Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
The Language of Two 18th Century Women’s Diaries
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The Language of Two 18th Century Women’s Diaries

Christina Charlotta Hiärne (b. 1722), the daughter of Professor Olof Rudbeck, started her diary in 1744 and continued until her death in 1804. She was involved in the Moravian Church in Stockholm and her diaries, comprising thousands of pages, focus on belief and spirituality. These diary entries show many similarities with those of Metta Magdalena Lillie, a contemporary noblewoman, who kept a diary from 1737 to 1750. Lillie’s diary entries likewise centre on spiritual reflections. Few eighteenth-century diaries written by women are extant, and these two diarists are important sources on women’s private writing during this period. Christina Hiärne and Metta Lillie came from different backgrounds; they had received different levels of education, lived in different parts of Sweden and wrote their diaries under different circumstances. Nevertheless, there are many indications of a shared discourse, as evidenced by the similarity in textual patterns and language conventions.

By:
Jessica Eriksson
May 4, 2018, 2:40 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: Legacy A Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Picturing Colonization: Sámi Film and Cultural Activism
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Picturing Colonization: Sámi Film and Cultural Activism

This paper examines the history of films made by Sámi filmmakers regarding Sámi colonial experiences. Films discussed date from the 1980s to the present. Filmmakers discussed include Nils Gaup, Paul-Anders Simma, and Amanda Kernell. The paper argues that film represents a particularly effective way for Sámi artist-activists to share knowledge of the Sámi siltuation with members of Nordic society and with an interested international audience.

By:
Thomas A. DuBois
May 4, 2018, 2:40 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: Legacy B Track: Saami Type: 20 min
En dag kommer alla pojktanter att ta över jorden: The Look and Feel of Swedish Trans Cinema
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En dag kommer alla pojktanter att ta över jorden: The Look and Feel of Swedish Trans Cinema

This paper shows that recent films by and about transgender and genderqueer people in Sweden have contributed to a new body of cinema that both traverses and ruptures the heteronormative structures of the cinematic experience, thus dramatically altering the reciprocally tactile relationship between spectator and film. Drawing on phenomenological criticism that identifies how structures of the filmic experience correspond to structures of the human body, especially the acts of touching and being touched, I argue that the recent influx of Swedish trans cinema presents the film’s body with a new look and feel—a filmic body whose gestures, expressions, and place in the world are innovatively informed by a queer subjectivity, hapticity, and spatiality. Among the films presenting bold iterations of a trans filmic body are Ester Martin Bergsmark’s Pojktanten (2012) and Någonting Måste Gå Sönder (2014), Victor Lindgren’s Ta av mig (2012), and Alexandra-Therese Keining’s Pojkarna (2015).

By:
Benjamin Mier-Cruz
May 4, 2018, 2:40 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: Optimist A Track: Gender Type: 20 min
The transnational circulation and impact of Georg Brandes’ opening lecture (1871): The US example
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The transnational circulation and impact of Georg Brandes’ opening lecture (1871): The US example

As Bourdieu argued, 'texts circulate without their context'. This can lead to misunderstandings and new understandings, especially in the transnational circulation of texts, where translation, linguistic and cultural, is at play, interestingly exemplified by the opening lecture of the Main Currents…. Outside of Scandinavia, Brandes’ lecture – with its agitation against cultural parochialism – is little known. In the worlding of his authorship, however, arguments from the original text did emerge. This paper will explore the transmission and impact of the text in different cultural settings and points-in-time by highlighting different practises of internationalization, authorial and on behalf of his intermediaries. A special focus will be given to the American afterlife, including an early and overlooked episode from the 1890s, featuring the Chicago journalist William Morton Payne. To further illustrate the transnational dynamics of the text in local, peripheral contexts, perspectives from Finland and Japan will also be included.

By:
Jens Bjerring-Hansen
May 4, 2018, 2:40 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: Reintroducing Brandes Type: 20 min
Jim Crow in Translation: Sherman Adams’s Mitt Amerika, “My Sweden,” and collected manuscripts at Oglethorpe University
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Jim Crow in Translation: Sherman Adams’s Mitt Amerika, “My Sweden,” and collected manuscripts at Oglethorpe University

Sherman Adams was an African-American journalist, author, and activist who left America in 1963 to settle in Sweden. His autobiography, published in 1980 as Mitt Amerika: En svart avhoppares memoarer, is an important document within African-American letters. Mitt Amerika is a translation into Swedish by Bo Rudin; Adams’s English original was never published. However, the recent donation of Adams’s papers to Oglethorpe University has made it possible to piece together what his English looked like. The papers contain multiple drafts of chapters from Mitt Amerika, along with a follow-up, 'My Sweden,' that Adams was composing when he died in 1985. The manuscripts allow us to observe how Rudin rendered Adams’s black American vernacular into Swedish. They also raise the question of whether Mitt Amerika can ever be published in English. I will sketch some problems that might attend a complete English edition of Mitt Amerika, and suggest some possible solutions.

By:
David Smith
May 4, 2018, 2:40 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: African Americans in Sweden Type: 20 min
Bound/Unbound Fins and Legs: Mermaids and Mobility in Edvard Munch, Agnes Slott-Møller and Anne-Marie Carl-Nielsen
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Bound/Unbound Fins and Legs: Mermaids and Mobility in Edvard Munch, Agnes Slott-Møller and Anne-Marie Carl-Nielsen

Edvard Munch’s Mermaid (1896), a commission for a Norwegian merchant’s billiard room, depicts the torso and pubic region frontally, while curiously transitioning to fin only below the knees. His painting heightens attention to male desire while also immobilizing the female body. In contrast, in art based on the theme of merfolk by Anne-Marie Carl-Nielsen and Agnes Slott-Møller, Munch’s Danish contemporaries, the female retains autonomous control over her body. Slott-Møller’s upright Agnete (1892) inverts the gender of desire and suggests movement of the woman between sea and shore and across life and death. Carl-Nielsen’s sketches for and bronze statue of the Little Mermaid (1921) exaggerate the torsion of the fin and the body’s motion through correct morphology. The arms, torso and fin are muscular and function in concert suggesting strength and power. This paper explores the body of the mermaid as signifying autonomy, movement and travel for these Nordic women artists.

By:
Alice Rudy Price
May 4, 2018, 2:40 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: Centennial C Track: Art Type: 20 min
2:45 pm
2:50 pm
2:55 pm
3:00 pm A Hundred Years of Success in Finnish Education
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A Hundred Years of Success in Finnish Education

At a time when American educators and public alike have become increasingly concerned about the quality of education, Finnish education has become increasingly successful.  Most Finnish schools are quiet and well-run.  Teachers are likely to comment that in spite of increased disciplinary concerns, the school curriculum, teaching, and level of student performance are superior to that of a generation ago.  Few American teachers of the same age group would say the same, particularly in reference to student performance.  Finnish teachers are satisfied with their work, feeling that they contribute to the well-being of society and that society respects them.  Finland is not just out-performing the United States; the small Nordic country has come to the attention of educational researchers world-wide because the Finns are out-performing many nations.  This paper will describe the evolution of the Finnish educational system and address some of the reasons for its success.

By:
Sharon Franklin-Rahkonen
May 4, 2018, 3:00 pm to 3:20 pm
Hall: Centennial AB Track: Education Type: 20 min
From Etic to Emic – and Back Again
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From Etic to Emic – and Back Again

A 21st-century re-examination of Alan Dundes' important folktale article from 1962 reveals its staying power as a remarkably insightful assessment of the wondertale's possible division into minimal syntagmatic units – instead of a succession of generally defined motifs, as Thompson had laid out. Dundes calls his units 'motifemes.' The present discussion takes up two interwoven points, as a kind of response to Dundes' call for a 'rigorous definition of structural units' as a springboard to further structural study. The first is a return to the linguistic work of Kenneth Pike, which forms the basis upon which Dundes constructed his term 'motifeme.' This emanates in a rather surprising twist, which is then applied to a specific contrast: a tale in the Evald Tang Kristensen's Danish collection is analysed alongside a tale from the contemporary Russian corpus of A. N. Afanas'ev. The example shows how an etic model as well as an emic one can provide us with useful information about the way magic tales work in a social context.  

By:
James Massengale
May 4, 2018, 3:00 pm to 3:20 pm
Hall: Legacy A Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Saami Portrayals in 20th Century Popular Literature: A Case of Ethnic Stereotyping
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Saami Portrayals in 20th Century Popular Literature: A Case of Ethnic Stereotyping

Scholars have conducted few studies on depictions of Saami ethnicity in popular media. Schoolbooks, ethnographic writings, and magazines present Saami ethnicity as static, uniform, and uni-dimensional. That composite of reindeer herders living in the past ignores Saami cultural diversity, including those who speak a Saami dialect and those who don’t, those who participate in traditional industries like reindeer herding (the vast minority) and those who work in non-traditional industries like computers, those who live in Sápmi and those who live outside of their original territories. In some cases, like live television coverage of the Lillehammer Olympics that introduced Saami ethnicity to millions of viewers, benefit Saami culture by bringing positive attention to the region. An analysis of Saami portrayals in twentieth century Scandinavian and English popular literature such as National Geographic, advertising, travel brochures, and school materials, illustrates how popular media created and perpetuated Saami stereotypes to the public.

By:
Robert P. Wheelersburg
May 4, 2018, 3:00 pm to 3:20 pm
Hall: Legacy B Track: Saami Type: 20 min
Staging a privileged vulnerability: Christina Hagen’s visual explorations of global encounters, precariousness, and precarity.
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Staging a privileged vulnerability: Christina Hagen’s visual explorations of global encounters, precariousness, and precarity.

In her work on precarity and precariousness, Judith Butler (2006, 2010) argues that vulnerability can be understood both in terms of existential and structural vulnerability. Inspired by Butler’s line of thought, I would like to look at how vulnerability is framed in two mixed media travel narratives by the Danish conceptual artist and writer Christina Hagen, Boyfrind (2012) and Jungle (2017). How is the global encounter framed by the privileged who perceive themselves as vulnerable? Working with mixed media, collected material, and different conceptual frameworks, these works have in common that they feature a white, Danish woman who often goes abroad due to heartbreak, depression or ennui, and who uses photography to examine the relationship between her own emotional vulnerability and the precarity of the global Other.

By:
Kristina Leganger Iversen
May 4, 2018, 3:00 pm to 3:20 pm
Hall: Optimist A Track: Gender Type: 20 min
Georg Brandes and the Writing of Typological Literary History
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Georg Brandes and the Writing of Typological Literary History

My talk will look into one of the devices introduced by Georg Brandes in the opening lecture and used especially in the first volume of Main Currents, that of the type. The type is used by Brandes to embody and synthesize multiple literary and cultural tendencies – and to move relatively freely between life and literature. But it also has a theoretical import and certain methodological implications as well as correlations to contemporary strands of realist literature: 'The literary critic passing from one variety to another of the type of a certain period in a manner resembles the scientist tracking some structure through its metamorphoses in the different zoological species', Brandes states programmatically in the first volume of Main Currents. How can we understand Brandes’ uses of the type in the light of earlier typologists (like Nodier, Balzac and Taine) and later ones (like, for instance, Lukács and Bakhtin)?

By:
Lasse Horne Kjaeldgaard
May 4, 2018, 3:00 pm to 3:20 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: Reintroducing Brandes Type: 20 min
African Americans in Sweden Question and Answer
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African Americans in Sweden Question and Answer

Session Chair: Jay Lutz

By:
Jay Lutz
May 4, 2018, 3:00 pm to 3:20 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: African Americans in Sweden
Barbro Nilsson–A Textile Artist's Vision of Nature
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Barbro Nilsson–A Textile Artist's Vision of Nature

Swedish artist Barbro Nilsson (1899–1983), though not well-known outside of Sweden, is arguably the country’s most recognized and influential textile designer and weaver. As a teacher at Konstfackskolan in Stockholm, Nilsson taught a generation of weavers as she developed her own visual language while integrating traditional Swedish methods of weaving. As the Creative Director of the preeminent textile studio Märta Måås-Fjetterström AB in Båstad, Nilsson introduced advanced techniques and a lasting aesthetic which many weavers acknowledge today. This paper presents five examples of Nilsson’s textiles and offers a primer on how to look at her work. This includes consideration of her compositions and themes, and their link to nature. Her construction of calming, rhythmic yet complex patterns is also explored. Discussion of Nilsson’s dynamic color palette, the idea of dyed wool as paint is essential. Examples illustrate color and form, and her spirit to create visual and tactile experiences.

By:
Jeffrey Head
May 4, 2018, 3:00 pm to 3:20 pm
Hall: Centennial C Track: Art Type: 20 min
3:05 pm
3:10 pm
3:15 pm
3:20 pm Question and Answer
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Question and Answer

Session Chair: David Östlund

By:
David Östlund
May 4, 2018, 3:20 pm to 3:30 pm
Hall: Centennial AB Track: General Papers
Question and Answer
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Question and Answer

Session Chair: James Massengale

By:
James Massengale
May 4, 2018, 3:20 pm to 3:30 pm
Hall: Legacy A Track: General Papers
Saami Question and Answer
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Saami Question and Answer

Session Chair: Thomas A. DuBois

By:
Thomas A. DuBois
May 4, 2018, 3:20 pm to 3:30 pm
Hall: Legacy B Track: Saami
Gender Question and Answer
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Gender Question and Answer

Session Chair: Jenny Björklund

By:
Jenny Bjorklund
May 4, 2018, 3:20 pm to 3:30 pm
Hall: Optimist A Track: Gender
Reintroducing Brandes - Question and Answer
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Reintroducing Brandes - Question and Answer

On or about November 3, 1871, Scandinavian culture and literature changed. The date is momentous due to Georg Brandes’ opening lecture of Main Currents in 19th Century Literature, announcing the necessity of, and possibly instigating, an epochal transformation of the cultural and literary backwater of the Nordic region. Brandes achieved instant fame and notoriety with this performance, which shaped his own career in many respects. Generically speaking, Brandes’ introductory lecture may be read as a veritable avant-garde manifesto, following the model of Karl Marx’ and Friedrich Engels’ Communist Manifesto (1848) and other 19th century political and revolutionary manifestoes. It lays out the plan for his classic literary historical work, which it took him almost two decades to finish, but it also responds to a number of provisional circumstances of his time and day. The panel will investigate the local contexts of Brandes’ lecture as a cultural event and the ramifications it had beyond the borders of Scandinavia, in European and global settings. Furthermore, it will explore the rhetorical and methodological tools employed by Brandes to maximize the impact of his critique of contemporary society.

By:
Julie K Allen
May 4, 2018, 3:20 pm to 3:30 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: Reintroducing Brandes
  Art Question and Answer
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Art Question and Answer

Session Chair: Øystein Sjåstad

By:
Oystein Sjaastad
May 4, 2018, 3:20 pm to 3:30 pm
Hall: Centennial C Track: Art
3:25 pm  
3:30 pm Coffee Break at Luskin center
3:35 pm
3:40 pm
3:45 pm Weather as Human Space in Harald Voetmann's 'Alt under månen'
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Weather as Human Space in Harald Voetmann's 'Alt under månen'

The paper will discuss the weather as a frontier for what it means to be human on the basis of a reading of Harald Voetmann’s 2014 novel 'Alt under månen' and on the basis of the weather theories of among others Michel Serres, Tim Ingold. The general idea being that weather is what goes on between the ground and the sky, that the contingent world of weather is what makes room between the two for the human. The novel discuss the human as it appears in the renaissance and uses the weather, more particularly the weather diaries of Tycho Brahe, to bring the rising idea of humanism in contact with insights into the weather. It does so in a manner that short circuits then and now emphasizing that we were never modern. The realm of the weather is – the paper claims – the realm of this always unaccomplished modernity.

By:
Dan Ringgaard
May 4, 2018, 3:45 pm to 4:05 pm
Hall: Centennial AB Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Runes on the frontier
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Runes on the frontier

In Scandinavia, stone runic monuments of the Late Viking Age are thought to have functions connected to inheritance and land-ownership. What were their functions on the Viking frontier? Runestones are found in some areas of the Viking diaspora but absent from others. There is no clear correlation between the density of runestones and the likely number of Norse settlers or intensity of contact with the 'homeland.' Rather, the distribution must relate to the meanings that runic inscriptions had in relation to the local community structure, including contacts with other cultural groups. I will survey the use of runes in different margins of the Viking World in relation to various factors that could shed light on their meanings in context - position in the Viking world; other monumental practices in the area (Norse or other); evidence for cultural contacts and hybridity.

By:
Kendra Willson
May 4, 2018, 3:45 pm to 4:05 pm
Hall: Legacy A Track: Old Norse Type: 20 min
The Stages of Free Love in Gunnar Heiberg’s The Balcony and Edvard Munch’s The City of Free Love
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The Stages of Free Love in Gunnar Heiberg’s The Balcony and Edvard Munch’s The City of Free Love

This paper compares and contrasts the portrayal of free love and the role of the female protagonists in Gunnar Heiberg’s play The Balcony (1894) and Edvard Munch’s play The City of Free Love (1905). The female protagonists in each play stand at the balcony or gate of the city, like Shakespearean Juliets, granting lovers entry into a relationship of free love. From these 'balcony scenes' the relationships transition into multiple stages of free love. While Heiberg casts free love in a positive light, Munch’s critique of free love goes hand-in-hand with his negative portrayal of Heiberg as a fat pig in his play and as a green-faced man in his painting The Dance of Life (1899-1900). In addition to this Munch painting, this paper also draws on comparisons with Munch’s Woman in three stages (1894) and his depiction of women at different stages in life and/or dancing with multiple partners.

By:
Kyle A. Korynta
May 4, 2018, 3:45 pm to 4:05 pm
Hall: Legacy B Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Film Noir, Jazz, and the City in Early Bergman
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Film Noir, Jazz, and the City in Early Bergman

This paper explores an under-investigated aspect of Bergman’s film authorship. Early Bergman (mid-40s to early 50s) contains a number of films in a Hollywood-inspired film noir vein. Tropes of these films include the loneliness, angst, and oppression of the big city (Stockholm in Bergman’s case), American-style jazz as the subversive imported music of youth and rebellion, and chiarascuro expressionist lighting modelled after Hollywood cinematographers like John Alton. Key films directed or written by Bergman in this period include Crisis, Woman without a Face, Eva, Port of Call, Music in Darkness, Prison, and the Hitchcockian thriller High Tension. Director of Photography Göran Strindberg and composer Erland von Koch are essential collaborators toward Bergman’s stylistics and aesthetics in this period, as is the mentorship of producer Lorens Marmstedt at Terrafilm (an edgier, more risk-taking studio compared to the more conservative Svensk Filmindustri). Early Bergman reveals a young director borrowing as freely from postwar Hollywood as from European cinema.

By:
Arne Lunde
May 4, 2018, 3:45 pm to 4:05 pm
Hall: Optimist A Track: Ingmar Bergman at 100 Type: 20 min
Fascism and Identity in Postwar Faroese Literature: Jens Pauli Heinesen’s Tú upphavsins heimur
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Fascism and Identity in Postwar Faroese Literature: Jens Pauli Heinesen’s Tú upphavsins heimur

For the Faroe Islands, World War II represents a turning point both in national identity and literary history, most notably in the recognition of the Faroese flag and the establishment of Faroese as the national language and the subsequent blossoming of literature written in Faroese. During this time, Jens Pauli Heinesen came to the forefront as the major prose writer on the Faroes. His first major novel, Tú upphavsins heimur (1962-1966) constructs a Faroese setting where fascism functions as a problematic antithesis to traditional Faroese national identity. This paper examines both the dovetailing of fascism as a literary device with the hermeneutics of Heinesen’s prose and how this dovetailing serves as a milestone in Faroese literary history.

By:
Bradley Harmon
May 4, 2018, 3:45 pm to 4:05 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Beginnings, frontiers and thresholds in the life of the individual: Reflections on Bjørnvig's essay ”Begyndelsen” (1948)
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Beginnings, frontiers and thresholds in the life of the individual: Reflections on Bjørnvig's essay ”Begyndelsen” (1948)

In his first published essay ever, 'Begyndelsen', Thorkild Bjørnvig proposes an original vision for the measure of human life fulfillment: childhood, or 'the beginning'. It is not only the unspoiled origin of human nature, in the manner of Rousseau, but also a promise that lies underneath any form of longing and expectation in art, society and individual life. In my paper I will explore the subtleties and the critical potentials of the concept of the beginning. It is tempting to reject it as a sentimental worship of childhood or perhaps one of many versions of the ideal of personal development, but I will try to see it as related to Hannah Arendt’s concept of 'natality' and an anti-heideggerian line of thought in the philosophy of life.

By:
Nils Gunder Hansen
May 4, 2018, 3:45 pm to 4:05 pm
Hall: Exploration Track: Thorkild Bjørnvig and Poetic Otherness Type: 20 min
Settler Colonialism, Neoliberalism, and White Supremacy: A Decolonial Perspective
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Settler Colonialism, Neoliberalism, and White Supremacy: A Decolonial Perspective

The increased visibility of white supremacist movements in recent years has captivated an international audience, leading to reevaluation of this reemergence, the merits and limitations of freedom of speech, and the role violence and fear have in both fascism and the suppression of fascism.  Curiously, these conversations did not burn nearly as hot inside of Indigenous communities.  Although the reasons for this are many, Indigenous communities recognize that mainstream politicians have been active and complicit in the promotion of a white supremacist agenda through the slow violence of settler colonialism and neoliberal economics.  For this contribution to this roundtable, I use Sámi and other Indigenous case studies to demonstrate the entanglement of settler colonialism and neoliberalism to white supremacist agendas.  I propose their systemic interdependence allows white supremacist movements to thrive, enabling settler colonialism to perpetuate itself.  These decolonial perspectives are helpful in dismantling these problems on a systemic level.

By:
Tim Frandy
May 4, 2018, 3:45 pm to 3:55 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: Ethics of Transmission Type: Roundtable
Not available for scheduling Not available for scheduling Dag Solstad: Arild Asnes, Either/Or
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Dag Solstad: Arild Asnes, Either/Or

The aim of this presentation is to show how Dag Solstad's novel Ar8ild Asnes, 1970 (1971) may be read as a dialogue with the three stages of life as described by Søren Kierkegaard in Either/Or (1843) and other writings.Solstad's novel depicts Arild Asnes, a fiction writer, as he goes through an existential crisis, which eventually leads to him joining the neo-Marxist movement. This was the case for Solstad himself, as for so many young intellectuals in Scandinavia at this time.I will show that Arild Asnes goes through a movement in several stages, towards his 'conversion' to Marxism. At first glance this may seem like regular Marxist dialectics. But at crucial moments he leaves the rationality held so dear in Marxist thinking. And it is my aim to show that these points of exit may be read as allusions to Kierkegaard and his thinking.

By:
Hadle Oftedal Andersen
May 4, 2018, 3:45 pm to 4:05 pm
Hall: Centennial C Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
3:50 pm
3:55 pm Fear the F-Word: The Case Against Activist Scholarship of the Radical Right
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Fear the F-Word: The Case Against Activist Scholarship of the Radical Right

Few designations are as damning and disqualifying in modern liberal democracies than 'fascist,' 'neo-Nazi,' or 'white supremacist.' The stigmatization associated with those terms is obvious: actors embracing them have been responsible for some of the most egregious crimes in human history. As commentators on contemporary instances of race and ethnic nationalism, scholars may feel obliged to invoke such language as part of an effort to expose similarities between our age and those of the past, to help prevent a recurrence of humanities most abhorrent injustices. But in my contribution to this round table, I will argue against the use of terms like fascism and the drawing of analogies between contemporary politics and those of the past more generally. My aim in doing this is not to minimize the threat posed by anti-globalist, anti-liberal forces today, nor to simply serve as a foil on the roundtable, but instead to highlight the urgent need to identify the novelty and inner complexities of these movements. Based on my own years of ethnographic fieldwork among nationalist activists in the Nordic countries, I will trace the nuances in ideology, methodology, and agenda pursued by contemporary opponents of immigration and multiculturalism. These are characteristics of consequence, both in terms of the ways these groups organize, and the particular threat they pose to liberal orders throughout the globe. I argue that the particularities and nuances of anti-liberal forces are fatally obscured by our language and analytical paradigm, and that a deescalation of tone will enable urgent insight.

By:
Benjamin Teitelbaum
May 4, 2018, 3:55 pm to 4:05 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: Ethics of Transmission Type: Roundtable
4:00 pm
4:05 pm Free at last. On the theme of freedom in Swedish science fiction novels
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Free at last. On the theme of freedom in Swedish science fiction novels

Freedom is something close to the heart of the genre of science fiction: the freedom of passing through frontiers, traveling through unexplored space, the freedom of creating new scientific marvels, the struggle for freedom in future oppressive dystopias. In this paper, I explore the theme of freedom in Swedish science fiction novels from the 1980s and 1990s. In Lars Gustafsson’s Det sällsamma djuret från norr (1989), people create elaborate virtual environments both as prisons and as means of escape. In Peter Nilson’s Projekt Nyaga (1995–1996), the young scientist protagonists revel in their freedom by withdrawing from society, unconcerned about the results of their actions. And in Sam J Lundwall’s Vasja Ambartsurian (1990), with reality itself breaking down, perhaps the only freedom is that of convincing yourself that you’re not real, that you’re already dead and nothing matters anymore.

By:
Svante Landgraf
May 4, 2018, 4:05 pm to 4:25 pm
Hall: Centennial AB Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Ynglingatal as frontier poetry
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Ynglingatal as frontier poetry

Ynglingatal ‘List of Kings’ is a (probably) early tenth-century poem, composed by a skald named Þjóðólfr from Kvinesdal in Vest-Agder. It lists the names of around twenty-six rulers and describes their – often bizarre – deaths. Recent scholarship on Ynglingatal is sharply divided, some reading it as an instance of normative royal ideology, some as a satire on the kings named. I will suggest that the dichotomous quality of Ynglingatal’s contemporary reception is rooted in its ‘frontier’ character. Probably composed in Viken, a region contested between Norwegian local rulers and the larger Danish polity, at a historical moment of religious and political transformation, Ynglingatal displays the medial frontier between locally-anchored oral memory and mobile, authored poetic commemoration. Its innovative thematization of the relationship between the poetic speaker and his material is both the reason for Ynglingatal’s contemporary influence (Nóregs konungatal, Hákonarkviða) and the most perplexing mystery this enigmatic poem confronts us with.

By:
Kate Heslop
May 4, 2018, 4:05 pm to 4:25 pm
Hall: Legacy A Track: Old Norse Type: 20 min
Ghosts and Daydreams: The Inner Worlds of Celestine by Olga Ravn
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Ghosts and Daydreams: The Inner Worlds of Celestine by Olga Ravn

This paper explores how Olga Ravn’s Celestine (2015) challenges key aspects of the discourse of feminist authors of the twentieth century (such as Hélène Cixous and Sandra Gilbert). Intersecting interests include the redefinition of patriarchal metaphors for authorship, voicelessness as a foil to creativity, and female authorship as a vital, positive force. While Ravn’s work is filled with ecological imagery of reproduction, any ultimately optimistic connotations are absent. Ravn offers a dark view of the female protagonist’s mental fabrications, but leaves their power and potential horror fully intact. The text explores the importance of silenced figures through Ravn’s attention to the creation of inner worlds as an alternative form of authorship, accessible even to those who lack official channels of expression. Out of nulls and blanks (an aimless protagonist and a fading ghost) comes something compelling: nothingness, oppression, and tragedy become sites of nucleation for internal lives.  

By:
Isobel Boles
May 4, 2018, 4:05 pm to 4:25 pm
Hall: Legacy B Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Musical Moments in Bergman Films
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Musical Moments in Bergman Films

Ingmar Bergman’s use of music in his films can in many respects be labeled as musical moments, which means that music in different ways is foregrounded in a scene. His films frequently have characters that are musicians performing music as well as he often used musical forms as a creative basis, both as inspiration or as a kind of structural pattern for the film. Musical performances or numbers in a more conventional sense of the notion can be seen in his productions from the late 1940s to his last in 2003. However, I would like to expand the notion of musical moments also to other instances in his films, to moments that are not performances or numbers but still, I would argue, are scenes that depend on and sometimes are structured to music; the music is foregrounded and a prerequisite for the scene. One reason they can have the status as musical moments is also
very much depending on Bergman’s very conscious and eclectic use of music in his films which make this scenes stand out as something extraordinary in the narration. This expanded kind of musical moments was used for different reasons: to express very strong emotions, to be an important turning point in the narration, to demarcate the play-within-in-the play, to show/express/perform the story’s nucleus, to take a place as communicator to mediate that which seems to be unbearable, or sometimes just to be a joyful short intermezzo. In all instances, music is used in a specific way, which has led some writers to call Bergman an
acoustic auteur. In this presentation, I will discuss some of these musical moments in the films of Ingmar Bergman, from humorous instances, over performances as cinematic motifs, to eerie mediations of angst and suffering. I think that these musical moments are crucial to the acoustic auteur, which some writers want to call Bergman.

By:
Ann-Kristin Wallengren
May 4, 2018, 4:05 pm to 4:25 pm
Hall: Optimist A Track: Ingmar Bergman at 100 Type: 20 min
Norden - a Frontier? Transnationalism, nationalism, and Nazism
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Norden - a Frontier? Transnationalism, nationalism, and Nazism

Norden as a concept consist of Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Iceland and Finland – Scandinavia of the three countries first mentioned. There is a difference in geographical terms, but more important in connotations: The concept of Scandinavia seems modern – Norden antimodern, contaminated even.   Stimulated by ideas about a shared Nordic prehistory, the Viking heritage, the Romanticists wanted to unify the Nordic countries. Scandinavianism failed politically, but the transnational cultural bonds remained. Nordic poetry reflects this dream of a united North. Even so in the 1930s, when nationalists and Nazis again focused the Norse heritage. Moreover, they referred to blood and race. The Nordic race was considered the foremost of races, and Nordmannen, the man of Norden, personified the ideal Aryan man. Also, the concept of Norden, the Nordic soul and Nordic mentality, was usurped by the Nazis and transformed into an imaginary Frontier, not formed by transnationalism, but by nationalism and Nazism.

By:
Bibi Marianne Jonsson
May 4, 2018, 4:05 pm to 4:25 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Writing Otherness: Nature and the Cosmos in Bjørnvig's Early Poetry
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Writing Otherness: Nature and the Cosmos in Bjørnvig's Early Poetry

In the concluding chapter of his book on his friendship with Karen Blixen, The Pact, (1974, 1983), the Danish poet Thorkild Bjørnvig suggests that the key to understanding their ultimate differences can be found in their different approaches to nature and the cosmos. Whereas she views the cosmos through nature and the elements, he sees things in the opposite perspective: 'nature and the elements ... are integrated in the cosmos and seen through it'. This paper explores the two realms of nature and the cosmos, as they appear in Bjørnvig's early poetry, asking how they are defined and what can be found in them, and tracing the ways the poetic self positions itself in relation to them. Mapping these encounters with otherness teaches us how writing works in threshold situations and offers significant perspectives on the modern (Cartesian) subject, especially its strategy of domination over nature, thus foreshadowing Bjørnvig's later turn to overtly ecological concerns.

By:
Jan Rosiek
May 4, 2018, 4:05 pm to 4:25 pm
Hall: Exploration Track: Thorkild Bjørnvig and Poetic Otherness Type: 20 min
Ásatrú in a Maximum Security Texas State Penitentiary: Is There a Place for Activist-Scholarly Engagement?
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Ásatrú in a Maximum Security Texas State Penitentiary: Is There a Place for Activist-Scholarly Engagement?

The leader of the Ásatrú practitioners in a state penitentiary in Texas recently sent me a letter. His community of Thor and Odin worshippers is unhappy because they are not allowed the same religious freedom as other faiths. They sought my engagement in their community and asked for my help in arguing to the State that they deserve equal treatment with other religions. I shared the letter with my Vikings class. One of my students found state records on the inmate who wrote the letter. He was in for first-degree murder. A book about the gruesome murder describes the murderer as a charming who always filled the role of pack leader. Ásatrú in prisons is often associated with white nationalist groups who see the Old Nordic worldview as the most purely Arian religion. How can/should we engage these communities from universities? What are the risks and benefits of such engagement?

By:
Davide M. Zori
May 4, 2018, 4:05 pm to 4:15 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: Ethics of Transmission Type: Roundtable
Knut Hamsun's Iselin as Object of Desire in Pan and Victoria
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Knut Hamsun's Iselin as Object of Desire in Pan and Victoria

In his novel, Pan, and novella, Victoria, Knut Hamsun depicts the myth of Iselin, the female symbol for libidinal energy, and her numerous love entanglements that entails heartbreak, thus necessitating sublimation.  Through the creation of Iselin as the ideal aesthetic object of desire and situating her as one who loves another, Hamsun makes his male characters, Thomas Glahn and Johannes Møller chase for this ideal through female characters similar to Iselin.  More importantly, however Hamsun depicts how Glahn and Johannes’s respective artistic natures require that they sublimate their desires to pursue Iselin as an ideal, resulting in artistic production through the form of writing and fantasy.  By conducting literary analysis through a psychoanalytic perspective, I show how the symbolic ideal of Iselin as Art drives the male characters’ desires in order to portray her through expression of desire for female human counterparts.

By:
Lisa Yamasaki
May 4, 2018, 4:05 pm to 4:25 pm
Hall: Centennial C Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
4:10 pm
4:15 pm Vikings in Public Discourses in the Age of Social Media
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Vikings in Public Discourses in the Age of Social Media

2017 was an eventful year for Viking scholarship in the public. Scientific claims of proof that the Norse were led by female warrior-generals and that the Norse believed in Allah were widely circulated by international media outlets and shared via social media. Both claims were heavily criticized by other scholars, and when the latter claim was thoroughly debunked by an Islamic art historian on Twitter, white supremacists found vindication in their belief in a flawed vision of the medieval past as both ‘white’ and ‘pure.’ The effects of scholarly debates taking place in a public, online space has unfortunately made our voices less credible instead of more. My contribution to this roundtable will focus on these online case studies and my own thoughts about public engagement, pedagogy, and scholarly activism.

By:
Colin Gioia Connors
May 4, 2018, 4:15 pm to 4:25 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: Ethics of Transmission Type: Roundtable
4:20 pm
4:25 pm Hope for the new – in Johannes V. Jensens Den ny Verden
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Hope for the new – in Johannes V. Jensens Den ny Verden

When we hope our hope is usually linked to the future. But occasionally the hope is for a place rather than for times to come. Places we have hope for can either be real or mythical. But to some extend they must be unknown to us: Hope depends on an element of something yet to be discovered – hope belongs to the frontier. If we attach hope to a real geographical space, we can make it capable of carrying our hope by mythologizing it. In Den ny Verden (1907) Johannes V. Jensen tells of his travels in America. He has high hopes for the new world. This paper will explore the literary figures used in Jensen’s writings on the hope for America.

By:
Hans Ulrik Rosengaard
May 4, 2018, 4:25 pm to 4:45 pm
Hall: Centennial AB Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Cultural Memory, Cultural Trauma: A Comparative Perspective on the return to the Pagan Past in Medieval Icelandic Literature
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Cultural Memory, Cultural Trauma: A Comparative Perspective on the return to the Pagan Past in Medieval Icelandic Literature

In Jan Assmann’s account of Cultural Memory the shift to a hermeneutic mode of social memory, while often stimulated by external disruption, is presented as an internal evolution from ritual to textual continuity. In medieval Iceland we do find ritual continuity replaced with textual continuity, but these are themselves part of the external disruption that accomplishes this change—as far as the initial establishment of Christian canon and priesthood goes, we are hardly speaking of an internal strategy in response to an external disruption. In this paper I will discuss the emergence of a textually mediated Cultural Memory in Iceland in light of examples of traumatic cultural loss, considering the roles of memory and trauma in the Icelandic case in comparison to other studies of societies that have turned to socially mediated remembering as a way of dealing with cultural loss and change.

By:
Carl Olsen
May 4, 2018, 4:25 pm to 4:45 pm
Hall: Legacy A Track: Old Norse Type: 20 min
Copenhagen Curtain Call - Opera as urban, national and cultural identity in Denmark
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Copenhagen Curtain Call - Opera as urban, national and cultural identity in Denmark

When in 1967 the French composer and conductor Pierre Boulez in a polemic move urged to blow up all opera houses he manifested the crises of a European institution. Opera, he claimed, had become a bourgeoise, exclusive and self-referential art-museum. Taking a closer look at the developments in the Scandinavian countries, however, Boulez’ polemic appears less relevant. After the Second World War, 'Nordic ' opera enters a phase of prosperity culminating in the spectacular new opera houses in Helsinki, Copenhagen, Oslo, and Reykjavik. But what makes this seemingly elitist art – again – so popular? In my paper I aim to cast light on the interactions between urban, political and aesthetic dimension of opera in Denmark and further the idea that encounters between real and imagined places (re-)shape urban, national and cultural identity.

By:
Clemens Raethel
May 4, 2018, 4:25 pm to 4:45 pm
Hall: Legacy B Track: Danish Cultural Branding Type: 20 min
Whatever Happened to Ingmar Bergman? Reception, Academic Agendas, and Interdisciplinary Frontiers
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Whatever Happened to Ingmar Bergman? Reception, Academic Agendas, and Interdisciplinary Frontiers

It is sometimes said that academia renews itself by gluttonously devouring its own history: one day some phenomenon is declared worthy of scrutiny, the next it is regurgitated. This is the case not least in the Humanities, in which phenomena on many levels are constantly re-evaluated according to various changes in society and academic market conditions. A rich object for study in this regard is director/writer Ingmar Bergman. As writer/director of about fifty features, director of more than one hundred plays, and author of short stories, novels and plays, his work has been revered, denigrated, and rehabilitated across time, in the name of a number of critical and academic agendas and disciplines. This paper will focus some major strands in how Bergman’s work has lent itself to a multitude of approaches and interdisciplinary borderlands, within a mainly Scandinavian and American context.  

By:
Maaret Koskinen
May 4, 2018, 4:25 pm to 4:45 pm
Hall: Optimist A Track: Ingmar Bergman at 100 Type: 20 min
Critiques of Whiteness in Post-Millennial Danish- and Swedish-Language Literature
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Critiques of Whiteness in Post-Millennial Danish- and Swedish-Language Literature

In contemporary Scandinavian contexts, critical engagements with racialisation and whiteness have since the Millennium increasingly materialized within literature, art, activism, academia and wider public debates. Currently, such engagements nevertheless constitute a scattered, still-emerging field. This paper focuses on constructions and critiques of whiteness in Danish- and Swedish-language novels, poetry and conceptual writing. Considering texts by Athena Farrokhzad, Maja Lee Langvad and Julie Sten-Knudsen, I will discuss how tropes of bodies, language, affect, kinship and citizenship display and complicate processes of racialisation. I will consider how racialised positionalities shape how whiteness is understood and critiqued – and which literary strategies are employed to do so. In this sense, I will explore in which ways the literary texts can themselves be read as literary whiteness critique. Contextualizing the texts, I will consider how they reflect whiteness in contemporary Scandinavia as shaped by entangled regional, national and global patterns of (post-)migration and coloniality.

By:
Astrid Sophie Oest Hansen
May 4, 2018, 4:25 pm to 4:45 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
The Poetics of Transhumanism: The Environmental Turn in Thorkild Bjørnvig’s Poetry and Tradition
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The Poetics of Transhumanism: The Environmental Turn in Thorkild Bjørnvig’s Poetry and Tradition

Despite the overall acclamation of the Danish Poet Thorkild Bjørnvig’s work, hardly any critical accounts include the ecological poetry in their appraisals, thereby explicitly dismissing or ignoring one of the major topics in the last two decades of Bjørnvig’s writings. Rereading some of Bjørnvig’s most significant ecological poetry in the context of contemporary Environmental Aesthetics, this paper suggests that Bjørnvig’s poetry of the 70s and 80s not only expands on an older transhumanist strand in his work, but also relocates him in a broader field of eco-poetics.

By:
Adam Paulsen
May 4, 2018, 4:25 pm to 4:45 pm
Hall: Exploration Track: Thorkild Bjørnvig and Poetic Otherness Type: 20 min
White Nationalism and the Net: Observations on 'A Nid on Nazis'
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White Nationalism and the Net: Observations on 'A Nid on Nazis'

Who owns the Vikings? The events at Charlottesville highlight the ways that Norse heritage has become a contested symbol of white identity. While many have been swift to condemn the events and racist ideologies of the 'Unite the Right' rally at Charlottesville, some responses have neither deconstructed white supremacy nor dismantled the illusion of a 'white' Middle Ages. Rather, some responses have merely displaced the claim to ownership of Viking heritage from one white group to another. Nazis are a threat, but fighting over ownership of medieval culture or reconstructed medieval ideologies is not a solution. I will bring to this panel a case-study from a genre of Internet memes that present themselves as anti-fascist and anti-racist, but are in fact dependent on the same insider-outsider logic used by white supremacists. My case-study is a short poem published on the popular thought-piece site Medium entitled 'A Nid on Nazis.'

By:
Lauren Elissa Poyer
May 4, 2018, 4:25 pm to 4:35 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: Ethics of Transmission Type: Roundtable
Conflicting Ethics of Life Writing in Karl Ove Knausgård's My Struggle
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Conflicting Ethics of Life Writing in Karl Ove Knausgård's My Struggle

The publication of Karl Ove Knausgård’s My Struggle (2009–2011) sparked a debate in Norwegian media about the relationship between literature and reality, and about the ethical implications of Knausgård’s portrayal of other people. Several family members objected to the way he made use of their lives for literary purposes. In the sixth and final volume of My Struggle, Knausgård discusses some of the objections to his project and reflects on the consequences of his writing. My Struggle’s genre and relation to reality is frequently addressed by scholars, but less attention has been given to ethical issues. This presentation explores how Knausgård's ethics (or rather poetics) of 'sincerity' and 'authenticity' conflicts with the ethics of privacy. Moreover, it considers how distance in time and space might reduce readers’ knowledge about the many biographical references in My Struggle, and thus the ethical implications for other people’s privacy become less apparent.

By:
Hilde Oevreness
May 4, 2018, 4:25 pm to 4:45 pm
Hall: Centennial C Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
4:30 pm
4:35 pm Troubling White Paradise
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Troubling White Paradise

White supremacists imagining paradise love to imagine Scandinavia, especially Iceland, and most especially medieval Iceland. What can we do, when teaching about Norse myth, Sagas, and Vikings, to make our classes inhospitable to white supremacists and white supremacist thinking? Scholars across the field(s) of Medieval Studies have been asking themselves similar questions since the 2017 International Medieval Congress, but they are even more urgent for Scandinavianists because our subject is even more dear to the extremists we abhor, because Old Norse is even less diverse than Medieval Studies, and because Iceland really is an island way out in the North Atlantic. Some of the strategies discussed in the wake of the 2017 IMC are not easy fits for us, but I‘ll share some ideas about syllabus design and course advertising I‘ve developed while trying to make my courses part of the solution rather than part of the problem.

By:
Merrill Kaplan
May 4, 2018, 4:35 pm to 4:45 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: Ethics of Transmission Type: Roundtable
4:40 pm
4:45 pm Question and Answer
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Question and Answer

Session Chair: Dan Ringgaard

By:
Dan Ringgaard
May 4, 2018, 4:45 pm to 5:05 pm
Hall: Centennial AB Track: General Papers
More than Mnemonics: Embodiment and Emplacement at the Frontier of Medieval Icelandic Literacy
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More than Mnemonics: Embodiment and Emplacement at the Frontier of Medieval Icelandic Literacy

Using anthropological studies of how oral cultures situate stories in real places as a direct result of the cognitive experience of embodiment, philosopher and cultural ecologist David Abram contends that with the transition from orality to literacy comes a cognitive shift toward a disembodied self-conceptualization. This study seeks to test Abram’s theory across a variety of Old Icelandic texts as a possible explanation for some broad generic and stylistic developments during the medieval period. Of particular interest is the fact that texts set during Iceland’s settlement have historically been deemed more realistic than later chivalric texts, partly due to the increasingly abstract, fantastical, and far-flung geographical settings of the latter. By investigating key moments of embodiment and emplacement in the texts, the study will explore whether changing depictions of place may be indicative not merely of borrowings from continental genres but rather of changes in the relationship to place itself.

By:
Sarah Bienko Eriksen
May 4, 2018, 4:45 pm to 5:05 pm
Hall: Legacy A Track: Old Norse Type: 20 min
Question and Answer
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Question and Answer

Session Chair: Kyle Korynta

By:
Kyle A. Korynta
May 4, 2018, 4:45 pm to 5:05 pm
Hall: Legacy B Track: General Papers
Ingmar Bergman at 100 Question and Answer
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Ingmar Bergman at 100 Question and Answer

Session Chair: Arne Lunde

By:
Arne Lunde
May 4, 2018, 4:45 pm to 5:05 pm
Hall: Optimist A Track: Ingmar Bergman at 100
Neoliberalism, Race and Masculinity in Ruben Östlund’s Rutan / The Square (2017)
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Neoliberalism, Race and Masculinity in Ruben Östlund’s Rutan / The Square (2017)

With its almost instantly iconic promotional image of an actor mimicking an ape, Swedish director Ruben Östlund’s most recent film Rutan / The Square (2017) makes his boldest – and strangest – commentary on capitalism and contemporary Swedish society. Though his previous, controversial films have at times intersected economics, race and masculinity, often with problematic results, this presentation will consider the ways Östlund’s latest film raises new questions and exposes economic hypocrisies and racial and gendered privileges in Swedish society, while refining many of his trademark stylistic features. In particular, the discussion will center around the progression from Östlund’s earlier films to this latest commentary on anxieties of masculinity, race, and economic privilege. Viewers are often left to wrestle with questions and face their own reflections within a system built on inequalities.

By:
Christian Gullette
May 4, 2018, 4:45 pm to 5:05 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: Contemporary film Type: 20 min
Of Birds and Men: Inhumanism in the Poetry of Thorkild Bjørnvig and Robinson Jeffers
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Of Birds and Men: Inhumanism in the Poetry of Thorkild Bjørnvig and Robinson Jeffers

Inhumanism' was for the Californian poet Robinson Jeffers the interest in the surrounding non-human realm, from the animal world to the geological structure of the world. This paper examines the concept of 'inhumanism' in Thorkild Bjørnvig’s poem 'Lappedykkeren' (1958) and Robinson Jeffers’s poem 'Hurt Hawks' (1928). The theme of the two poems is dying birds, and the feeling of respect and awe such a scene engender. For both Bjørnvig and Jeffers, the animal order preserves a primordiality that humans have long lost and forgotten. 'Inhumanism' is, in Jeffers’s words, this very 'shifting of emphasis and significance from man to not-man'. Jeffers focuses on the silent, animal dignity of the bird in this poem that Bjørnvig translated into Danish. In Bjørnvig’s poem, inhumanism takes a cultural critical turn, and concentrates on the harmful effect of the humans and of civilization on the animal world.

By:
Anders Ehlers Dam
May 4, 2018, 4:45 pm to 5:05 pm
Hall: Exploration Track: Thorkild Bjørnvig and Poetic Otherness Type: 20 min
Roundtable: Ethics of Transmission
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Roundtable: Ethics of Transmission

By:
Benjamin Teitelbaum, Colin Gioia Connors, Davide M. Zori, Lauren Elissa Poyer, Merrill Kaplan, Tim Frandy
May 4, 2018, 4:45 pm to 5:15 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: Ethics of Transmission Type: Roundtable
Citizens of that other place: Amalie Skram and Knut Hamsun’s autobiographical patient narratives
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Citizens of that other place: Amalie Skram and Knut Hamsun’s autobiographical patient narratives

Norwegian authors Amalie Skram and Knut Hamsun both define respectively naturalism and prose modernism in the Norwegian literary canon, but they have also written pioneer autobiographical works addressing mental health and involuntary hospitalization. In doing so, the authors show literary tendencies that are more relevant in today’s literary discussions than when the novels were first published. The works in question are Skram’s Professor Hieronimus and På St. Jørgen (1895) and Hamsun’s På gjengrodde stier (1949), all of which can be read as pathographies, understood as a book-length narrative about the author’s (alleged) illness. In my paper, I will discuss how Skram and Hamsun both make use of autobiographical techniques and tendencies that have been debated in the Norwegian literary climate over the most recent decade regarding authors such as Karl Ove Knausgård and Vigdis Hjorth. I will then explore how this relates to the autobiographical genre criteria of the patography.

By:
Ingri Løkholm Ramberg
May 4, 2018, 4:45 pm to 5:05 pm
Hall: Centennial C Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
4:50 pm
4:55 pm
5:00 pm
5:05 pm   Old Norse Question and Answer
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Old Norse Question and Answer

Session Chair: Kate Heslop

By:
Kate Heslop
May 4, 2018, 5:05 pm to 5:15 pm
Hall: Legacy A Track: Old Norse
    Question and Answer
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Question and Answer

Session Chair: Christian Gullette

By:
Christian Gullette
May 4, 2018, 5:05 pm to 5:15 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: Contemporary film
Thorkild Bjørnvig and Poetic Otherness Question and Answer
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Thorkild Bjørnvig and Poetic Otherness Question and Answer

At the occation of the centenary of the Danish poet Thorkild Bjørnvig (1918-2004), this panel will present four new readings of his work with special attention to the question of frontiers and otnerness. The panel will cover different periods of Bjørnvig’s work, and the papers will deal with both poetry and essays. A central theme throughout Bjørnvig’s work is nature. For Bjørnvig, nature represents something than transcends the human sphere, an otherness, that can be experienced in the withdrawal to nature or – as it will be explored in one of the papers – in the confrontation with animals. For Bjørnvig, poetry itself can be an opening to this otherness. Bjørnvig, who was also a translator of English and German poetry, is characterized by standing in a line of great European and American modern poetry, indcluding names such as Hölderlin, Yeats and Rilke. He also translated the Californian poet Robinson Jeffers, and Bjørnvig’s own poetry will be compared to Jeffers and his ideas about inhumanism. The frontier between man and nature is, in Bjørnvig’s work, as a paper shows, also linked to the cosmic visions in his poetry. In the 1960ies Bjørnvig’s literary work experienced what could be called an environmental turn, and this turn and its influence on Bjørnvig’s way of writing will be explored, too, in this panel on a poet that counts as one of the greatest Scandinavian poets of modern time.

By:
Anders Ehlers Dam
May 4, 2018, 5:05 pm to 5:15 pm
Hall: Exploration Track: Thorkild Bjørnvig and Poetic Otherness
Question and Answer
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Question and Answer

Session Chair: Hadle Oftedal Andersen

By:
Hadle Oftedal Andersen
May 4, 2018, 5:05 pm to 5:15 pm
Hall: Centennial C Track: General Papers
5:10 pm      
5:15 pm                          
5:20 pm                          
7:30 pm                 Music in the Films of Ingmar Bergman
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Music in the Films of Ingmar Bergman

By:
Anyssa Neumann, James Massengale
May 4, 2018, 7:30 pm to 8:50 pm
Hall: Collaboration Boardroom Track: Special Event
         
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Saturday, 5th May 2018

Time Centennial AB Legacy A Legacy B Optimist A Optimist B Exploration Illumination Laureate Collaboration Boardroom Centennial Terrace Royce Hall Germanic Seminar Room 1344 Schoenberger Hall Centennial C Entrepreneur Room Local Eateries Odyssey
9:00 am Business Meeting
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Business Meeting

By:
SASS
May 5, 2018, 9:00 am to 10:15 am
Hall: Centennial AB Track: Business Meeting
                        Book Display
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Book Display

By:
SASS
May 5, 2018, 9:00 am to 5:30 pm
Hall: Entrepreneur Room Track: Book display
   
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10:15 am Coffee Break at Luskin center    
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10:30 am Interdisciplinary writing – Teacher's beliefs facing new contexts
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Interdisciplinary writing – Teacher's beliefs facing new contexts

My aim in this presentation is to reflect upon how a teacher in Norwegian and a teacher in Social Science choose their actions in a certain classroom context involving an interdisciplinary writing project. In addition to how these teachers enact in the present project I will compare my observations with the teachers' descriptions of how they usually teach writing within their respective subjects. In my analysis, I will make use of 'teacher’s beliefs' (Fives & Buehl, 2012) as a concept for interpreting the teacher’s descriptions as well as their actions in both the interdisciplinary project and their usual teaching. The results identify a gap between the teachers' general writing beliefs and their beliefs in the specific writing project as the collaboration with another teacher and another subject seems to make the teachers act out a narrower understanding of their role as writing teachers.

By:
Pernille Fiskerstrand
May 5, 2018, 10:30 am to 10:50 am
Hall: Centennial AB Track: Education Type: 20 min
A Journey through Finnmark – linguistic Landscapes at the Frontiers
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A Journey through Finnmark – linguistic Landscapes at the Frontiers

On a global scale, multilingualism is far more prevalent than monolingualism. It is often stated that multilingualism is typical for modern societies, and especially of cities, due to the general cultural complexity among their large groups of inhabitants. However, also smaller societies can be characterized as predominantly multilingual, and neither is it necessarily a modern feature. In this paper I will focus on Finnmark county, situated in the extreme north-eastern part of Norway, recognized for its multiculturalism and multilingualism. My point of departure is a five-day long roadtrip in Finnmark in 2017. Through features of the linguistic landscape in various parts of this county, I will highlight and discuss some central historical and modern linguistic characteristics of different parts of Finnmark. My aim is to contribute to describing the complexity of multilingual societies, both with regard to historical developments, and to demographics.

By:
Gro-Renée Rambø
May 5, 2018, 10:30 am to 10:50 am
Hall: Legacy A Track: Linguistics Type: 20 min
Silence! Action! Rolling!
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Silence! Action! Rolling!

This presentation will give a brief overview of the past and the present of the extended classroom based on our 15+ years of experience within the UC-System. A focus will be on the core founding principles, of which having a synchronous classroom is paramount. A discussion will follow of the pedagogical underpinnings of teaching LCTLs in the current environment, while utilizing 'open source' knowledge sharing. Further we argue that the benefits greatly outweigh the challenges and negative implications of choosing this educational strategy. In as much as it serves a larger student body and the greater FL community in practical reality. Lastly we will address the future of what could be. The presentation will conclude with a short demo of a live on air extended classroom session

By:
Karen Møller, Lotta Weckström
May 5, 2018, 10:30 am to 11:10 am
Hall: Legacy B Track: The Extended Classroom Type: 20 min
Et Slags Folck: The Relationship of Norway and Sweden in 16th-Century Humanist Historical Imagination
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Et Slags Folck: The Relationship of Norway and Sweden in 16th-Century Humanist Historical Imagination

During the mid-to-late 16th-Century, a time of intense rivalry and warfare between the Denmark and Sweden, the status of Norway and its people were a subject of particular ideological contest.  Royally-endorsed Swedish humanist writers such as Johannes Magnus advanced the Gothicist view of history, in which Sweden was the original and most pre-eminent of the Scandinavian kingdoms.  While Norway’s Danish kings were generally maligned as illegitimate tyrants, Norway was cast as a worthy but unfortunate victim, naturally having more in common with Sweden than Denmark. Norway produced relatively little history-writing during this period, but noteworthy exceptions include the historical-topographical works of Absalon Pederssøn Beyer and Peder Claussøn Friis.  This paper will examine how ideas in these Norwegian works compared with contemporary Swedish Gothicist views of Norway, placing them in the context of Swedish king Erik XIV’s campaign to win over Norwegians, and the tradition of bondefred (farmer-peace) along the frontiers.

By:
Dean William Bennett
May 5, 2018, 10:30 am to 10:50 am
Hall: Optimist A Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Twenty Plus Years of Ibsen's Women: A Roundtable in Honor of Joan Templeton
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Twenty Plus Years of Ibsen's Women: A Roundtable in Honor of Joan Templeton

Roundtable in honor of Joan Templeton

By:
Frode Helland, Mary Kay Norseng, Olivia Noble Gunn, Paal Bjoerby, Ross Shideler
May 5, 2018, 10:30 am to 10:35 am
Hall: Optimist B Track: Twenty plus Years of Ibsens Women Type: Roundtable
Spoken Boundaries, Unspoken Activisms: Languages and Texts in Sámi Popular Music
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Spoken Boundaries, Unspoken Activisms: Languages and Texts in Sámi Popular Music

This paper explores the ways Sámi artists target or exclude communities and audiences through the use of language in popular music. In music that wages social, political, and environmental activism, Sámi musicians may choose to sing in English, Swedish, Norwegian, or a Sámi dialect. Through deliberate language selection, they may either reach a broader global audience, confront a particular audience such as the Swedish government, or limit expressions of solidarity to the Sámi community. My paper explores these issues focusing on the work of Sámi activist-artist Sofia Jannok and highlighting the way language reflects her and others’ need to message to multiple audiences. With this analysis, my study contributes an understanding of activism occurring at the international, national, and local levels within Sámi music and politics, as well as the boundaries of participation.

By:
Kelsey Allyn Fuller
May 5, 2018, 10:30 am to 10:50 am
Hall: Exploration Track: Music and Identity Type: 20 min
Whiteness and the Nordic Body
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Whiteness and the Nordic Body

This paper examines paintings from around 1900, produced by Norwegians, Swedes, Danes, and Finns, that have constituted the category of 'Vitalist' representations.  Viewed through the lenses of medical and anthropological theories of race, and through early sociological studies of city life, the paper analyzes these works as constituent elements in the modern construction of the 'Nordic.'  Whiteness is often taken for granted, or understood to be a natural condition of the bodies represented in such paintings.  This paper interrogates the terms of such naturalized racialization.

By:
Patricia Berman
May 5, 2018, 10:30 am to 10:40 am
Hall: Illumination Track: Critical Race Studies and Scandinavian Visual Culture Type: 20 min
50 billion micrograms
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50 billion micrograms

This paper approaches questions about memory and history from a personal and practical perspective related to a specific art project. It discusses the way in which art-making could be an alternative way to approach the past. In the work 50 billion micrograms (2015) I took an unsolved mystery and a forgotten media event in 1979 as point of departure. Almost 36 years ago, a giant meteorite reportedly landed in Swan Lake at the Norwegian West coast. Based on the size of the hole in the ice, it was assumed that the meteorite weighed about 50 tons. After a long series of newspaper articles and investigations both in local and national newspapers it was concluded that the item on the lake bottom was not from space.  My paper is not just about the meteorite’s disappearance; it examines the loss of memory in a time when our cyber networks did not exist.

By:
Christine Hansen
May 5, 2018, 10:30 am to 10:50 am
Hall: Laureate Track: Photography Type: 20 min
Not available for scheduling Not available for scheduling    
10:35 am Templeton Reverberations
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Templeton Reverberations

A look at how Templeton's readings of Ibsen's plays have influenced my readings of other, non-Scandinavian texts. My own readings have in turn doubled back to Templeton's, creating a quiet ricochet of interpretations, hers and mine.

By:
Mary Kay Norseng
May 5, 2018, 10:35 am to 10:45 am
Hall: Optimist B Track: Twenty plus Years of Ibsens Women Type: 20 min
   
10:40 am Race and the Commemoration of the Transfer of the Danish West Indies to the United States in 2017
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Race and the Commemoration of the Transfer of the Danish West Indies to the United States in 2017

2017 marked the 100th anniversary of the transfer of the Danish West Indies, today’s US Virgin Islands, to the United States. The occasion was commemorated in a large number of cultural events and public debates in Denmark. The presentation will give a few examples from exhibitions, visual and performance art to shed light on the relevance of race – and of critical race studies – when attempting to understand the relation of Denmark with its former colony. The examples point at two simultaneous tendencies: on the one hand a still noticeable conflation of nationality and whiteness, and the 'birth of a decolonial movement' (Virgin Islands based visual artist La Vaughn Belle) on the other. 

By:
Lill-Ann Körber
May 5, 2018, 10:40 am to 10:50 am
Hall: Illumination Track: Critical Race Studies and Scandinavian Visual Culture Type: 20 min
   
10:45 am Joan Templeton and the ICLA Meeting in Munich
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Joan Templeton and the ICLA Meeting in Munich

Joan Templeton and the ICLA Meeting in Munich

By:
Ross Shideler
May 5, 2018, 10:45 am to 10:55 am
Hall: Optimist B Track: Twenty plus Years of Ibsens Women Type: 20 min
   
10:50 am Monolingual biliteracy
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Monolingual biliteracy

Spoken Norwegian has two forms as a written medium, Bokmål and Nynorsk, unevenly represented in the different regions of Norway. In recent years, attempts have been made to link good school results in typical ​​Nynorsk areas, with the cognitive advantages usually associated with bilingualism. Yet, concurrence is not necessarily the same as connection. According to a traditional definition, Norwegian is still counted as one single language, consisting of several mutually comprehensive dialects and written variants. However, in grammar, syntax and spelling the two varieties differ to such an extent that it is correct to refer to them as two different written languages. In this paper, I intend to look more closely at the premises for defining Bokmål and Nynorsk as two different languages, and discuss whether users of Bokmål and Nynorsk can be considered to be bilingual or not.

By:
Hjalmar Eiksund
May 5, 2018, 10:50 am to 11:10 am
Hall: Centennial AB Track: Education Type: 20 min
Do Scandinavian dictionaries take a stand on language policy?
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Do Scandinavian dictionaries take a stand on language policy?

The Danish dictionary, the Norwegian Academy’s dictionary and the Swedish Academy glossary constitute central linguistic Scandinavian works of reference. However, users often want to check if a word really 'exists', and view the words included as approved by authorities.  Modern lexicography, however, builds on instances in major corpora.In Sweden, a debate on the use and the political connotations of the gender neutral pronoun 'hen' started in 2012 (e.g. Milles 2011, Ledin 2012, Parkvall 2012, Sabuni 2012, Språkrådet 2015, Språktidningen 2016). In 2015, however, the word 'hen' was used sufficiently for inclusion in the Swedish Academy glossary. The new edition was launched under the heading, 'Hen is here now', which ended the debate. Presently, the pronoun is relatively neutral in Sweden.High status dictionaries are doubtless political actors in a language community. What is the responsibility of the glossary editors? Would a representative corpus be a solution to linguicism?

By:
Judy Ribeck Nyström
May 5, 2018, 10:50 am to 11:10 am
Hall: Legacy A Track: Linguistics Type: 20 min
Such A Splendor of Brightness': Ringsted and the Establishment of Knud Lavard's Cult Site in Religious Narrative
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Such A Splendor of Brightness': Ringsted and the Establishment of Knud Lavard's Cult Site in Religious Narrative

Location has played a role in religion throughout recorded history. This holds true for both medieval Denmark and the Christian cult of the saints. So why was Duke Knud Lavard, the second Danish royal saint, buried at the relatively inconsequential church in Ringsted? This paper explores two religious narratives to answer that question. First, the offices and masses commissioned by Valdemar I in 1170 in Kiel University Library's MS S.H. 8 A.8∞, which emphasizes locality in its music and words; and second, the miracles compiled by Robert of Ely in 1135 which survive in the Arnamagnaean Institute’s AM 1049 4° and shows the saint himself designated Ringsted’s importance. Exploring this question through these two public media demonstrates the cult’s success was not possible without the Danish people’s acceptance of the saint’s post mortem will and power.

By:
Martin Nelson
May 5, 2018, 10:50 am to 11:10 am
Hall: Optimist A Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Musical Frontiers and Scandinavian Studies: Old Norse Language and Literature in Scandinavian Black and Viking Metal
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Musical Frontiers and Scandinavian Studies: Old Norse Language and Literature in Scandinavian Black and Viking Metal

While Old Norse mythological literature has long been a major source of inspiration for  numerous black and viking metal bands, detailed studies of the use of Old Norse literature and language hardly exist (a general overview of Norwegian black metal is offered in van Helden 2017). I will devote my talk to the discussion of the main Old Norse texts and the most frequently employed themes in black and viking metal, the treatment and interpretation of Old Norse mythology, as well as the language(s) used in black/viking metal lyrics. In this talk, I will limit the discussion to the Scandinavian bands, both because of the amount of the material, and because of Scandinavia being the birth-place of the two genres.  

By:
Aurelijus Vijunas
May 5, 2018, 10:50 am to 11:10 am
Hall: Exploration Track: Music and Identity Type: 20 min
Race and Post-Colonial Identity in Contemporary Nordic Performance Art
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Race and Post-Colonial Identity in Contemporary Nordic Performance Art

This presentation examines the prevalence of performance and the use of the body as it relates to the work of Nordic artists addressing race and post-colonial identity. I use Jeannette Ehlers’ and Pia Arke’s work as case studies to examine race and post-colonial discourse in Denmark. Ehlers and Arke use their bodies as instruments of destruction, mirroring the violence and trauma inflicted upon the land, people, and cultures of the West Indies and Greenland. The intricacies of the artists’ own racial and ethnic background are essential to their work, as Danish colonial rule resulted in the silencing and erasure of the colonized.

By:
Alison Chang
May 5, 2018, 10:50 am to 11:00 am
Hall: Illumination Track: Critical Race Studies and Scandinavian Visual Culture Type: 20 min
Nu skal vi have det lidt hyggeligt': Hygge – and Uhygge – in Helle Helle's Novels
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Nu skal vi have det lidt hyggeligt': Hygge – and Uhygge – in Helle Helle's Novels

In my paper, I want to discuss hygge in relation to Helle Helle’s novels. My point of departure is the numerous books on hygge that have made it to the bestseller lists in recent years, as I will identify how these books characterize hygge and its different elements. Then, I turn to Helle Helle’s novels, where the characters often talk about wanting to create hygge and where we find all the elements named in the popular books on hygge. Despite of this, I will show that there is no such thing as hygge in Helle Helle’s novels. This will lead into a discussion of why that is and, more generally, what the relationship is between hygge and language with a discussion of how hygge as a speech act always deconstructs what it tries to designate. Hygge, I argue, can only exist retrospectively, making the numerous popular books obsolete.

By:
Claus Elholm Andersen
May 5, 2018, 10:50 am to 11:10 am
Hall: Laureate Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
   
10:55 am In Honor of Joan Templeton
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In Honor of Joan Templeton

By:
Frode Helland
May 5, 2018, 10:55 am to 11:05 am
Hall: Optimist B Track: Twenty plus Years of Ibsens Women Type: Roundtable
   
11:00 am Blackness on Swedish Public Service Television: 'The Race Card'
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Blackness on Swedish Public Service Television: 'The Race Card'

In 2014, the airing of the documentary film Raskortet (The Race Card) (Karim, 2014) on Swedish prime-time public service television marked a key moment in both Swedish television history and Afro-Swedish history. Chronicling the everyday experiences of nine Afro-Swedes, Raskortet quickly created a highly charged debate that became the focus of radio, television, and newspaper commentary for several weeks after its broadcast. Some critics, mostly of color, described it as failing to contribute anything new to anti-racist struggle, while others gave it high praise for making everyday racism visible to the nation. In an effort to stimulate rich discussion on visual culture and critical race analyses in the Scandinavian context, in this presentation, I put an analysis of the documentary in conversation with the many responses it brought forth from multiple publics.

By:
Nana Osei-Kofi
May 5, 2018, 11:00 am to 11:10 am
Hall: Illumination Track: Critical Race Studies and Scandinavian Visual Culture Type: 20 min
   
11:05 am In Honor of Joan Templeton
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In Honor of Joan Templeton

By:
Olivia Noble Gunn
May 5, 2018, 11:05 am to 11:15 am
Hall: Optimist B Track: Twenty plus Years of Ibsens Women Type: Roundtable
   
11:10 am Young pupils critical reading: A think aloud study
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Young pupils critical reading: A think aloud study

In and out of school pupils have to deal with different types of Internet texts , which callenge the pupils' critical thinking. The present think aloud study (Ericsson & Simon, 1984) sets out to explore Norwegian 7th-graders use of different text processing strategies while reading partly contradictory, expository texts. This is a case study of the high skilled reader, Helene, and the low skilled reader, Lars, based on two different reading comprehension measures. I have investigated differences in processing skills throughout their reading processes and their reading outcome.The results from the verbal protocols show great differences between these two cases in terms of strategy use, reading scores, learning outcome and critical thinking. While the low skilled reader uses surface strategies as paraphrasing, the high skilled reader uses more deeper strategies as elaboration and evaluation.

By:
Wenke Mork Rogne
May 5, 2018, 11:10 am to 11:30 am
Hall: Centennial AB Track: Education Type: 20 min
Appropriation of the Personal and the Third-Person Perspective in Finnish Stand-Up Comedy
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Appropriation of the Personal and the Third-Person Perspective in Finnish Stand-Up Comedy

The performance genre of stand-up is a mixture of globally shared poetic forms and locally anchored contents. In particular, this presentation explores public appropriations of the personal and the local aspects of experience in Finnish stand-up comedy. Appropriations of the personal form a critical area of interest within stand-up comedy, which revolves around aestheticized elaboration of comic personae. Even at their most personal, however, stand-up comics tend to assign their private lives with general social resonance, conceptualized in my paper through the notion of allegory. The paper argues how stand-up performances enable and embrace the appropriation of the personal through the third-person perspective. In this regard, I will develop a methodological framework of the first-, second-, and third-person perspectives as elemental modes of self-(re-)presentation in stand-up to be deployed in empirical analysis. The analysis is complemented by written questionnaire answers from Finnish comics.

By:
Antti Lindfors
May 5, 2018, 11:10 am to 11:30 am
Hall: Legacy A Track: Linguistics Type: 20 min
The Online Classroom as a Community of Inquiry
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The Online Classroom as a Community of Inquiry

The sociocultural theory, the idea that we learn in interaction with others, has had an immense impact on the field of education. For the past 20 years, the theory has gained momentum within the field of online education and inspired the online learning model Community of Inquiry. The model consists of three elements that are usually considered the backbone of any successful online learning environment: social presence, teaching presence and cognitive presence. This study examines 1) how the courses in Swedish at UCLA were re-designed when evolving into blended synchronous language courses, and 2) what specific measures were taken to meet the need for social presence, teaching presence and cognitive presence. Key findings include: 1) the importance of carefully selecting technologies for active learning, 2) the need for visual and auditory presence to feel as part of the group, and 3) the importance of pedagogical adaptation in an online classroom.

By:
Johanna Karlsson
May 5, 2018, 11:10 am to 11:30 am
Hall: Legacy B Track: The Extended Classroom Type: 20 min
The Bishop from the Outside: Bishop Petrus Follingius of Turku 1558-1563
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The Bishop from the Outside: Bishop Petrus Follingius of Turku 1558-1563

Of all of the bishops of Turku (Åbo), Petrus Follingius had one of the shortest tenures. Nonetheless, his episcopacy provides two useful insights into the state of Finland's church after four decades of royal and Lutheran reform. First, it demonstrates the extent to which the church had become a royal institution under King Gustav Vasa (r. 1523-1560). Follingius was appointed by the king with little or no input from the diocesan leadership. He was the first bishop in nearly two hundred years who was not born in or had worked in the diocese before his appointment. Follingius was removed from office in 1563 by Gustav Vasa's successor, King Erik XIV, and assigned to run the diocese of Reval (Tallinn). Kings moved bishops around the ecclesiatical administration like they moved officials in the royal bureaucracy.Secondly, Follingius's tenure reveals the insularity of Finland's clergy. Primary sources suggest that many of Finland's clergymen saw Follingius as an unwelcome outsider. He was considered patronizing. He also had no command of Finnish, likely the first bishop in two centuries. The extant scholarship assumes that Follingius was unwilling to integrate himself in the diocese, contributing to Erik's decision to remove him in 1563. The sources also suggest that Follingius took his work as bishop seriously by conducting visitations of parishes and rebuilding the diocesan administration. This paper will argue that his conflicts with the diocese's clergy stemmed at least in part from an outsider's difficulty in exercising influence ovver an insular and even xenophobic community of clergymen.This paper is part of a larger book project on the conflicts in Finland's church in the second half of the sixteenth century. The case of Petrus Follingius is a part of the larger struggle of the Swedish kingdom's rulers to maintain royal control over the church throughout the realm.

By:
Jason Lavery
May 5, 2018, 11:10 am to 11:30 am
Hall: Optimist A Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Sounding Supranationalism: Historic and Emergent Visions of Europe at Norway's Slottsfjell Music Festival
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Sounding Supranationalism: Historic and Emergent Visions of Europe at Norway's Slottsfjell Music Festival

This paper explores the Norwegian popular music festival Slottsfjell and its role in the European Talent Exchange Program (ETEP), a transnational, European Commission sponsored network of festivals and artists designed to place emerging European acts on stages throughout the continent. Slottsfjell is an annual multi-genre festival occurring on the grounds of Slottsfjell Castle, a modern memorial at the location of the historic Tønsberg Fortress. In 2017, Slottsfjell featured eight ETEP sponsored acts from four countries and several ETEP alumni (nearly 20 percent of the total lineup), making it a very active festival in the network. Drawing from ethnomusicological research involving musical scenes, festival research involving placemaking, and political science theories of supranational European integration, I argue that Slottsfjell’s marriage of the historic to the emergent and its placement in a country external to the European Union make it a strategic, yet problematic point of European identity creation.

By:
Lucas Henry
May 5, 2018, 11:10 am to 11:30 am
Hall: Exploration Track: Music and Identity Type: 20 min
Critical Race Studies and Scandinavian Visual Culture
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Critical Race Studies and Scandinavian Visual Culture

The aim of the workshop is to discuss how approaches from critical race studies can be applied to Scandinavian visual culture past and present. The examination of privilege and marginalization connected to race and ethnicity has only entered the study of Scandinavian art and culture fairly recently, most often in the form of postcolonial analyses. It gains increased urgency, however, in the view of renewed claims of white supremacy, increasing instances of racism and xenophobia, and anti-immigration policies in the Nordic countries.
The first half of the workshop is dedicated to four 10-minute presentations. The idea behind the short input papers is to explore the topic’s geographical spectrum: covering examples from all Scandinavian countries including the former colonies Greenland and the US Virgin Islands; methodological dimensions: covering art historiography, curatorial practice, and the research of nation building processes and memory culture; variety of medial expressions: including, among other art forms and visual media, painting, performance and installation art, and television. In the second half of the workshop, the audience will be invited to engage in a discussion with the presenters about the relevance, specifics and challenges when researching, and putting into practice, race-related issues pertaining to Scandinavian visual culture.

By:
Allison Morehead
May 5, 2018, 11:10 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: Critical Race Studies and Scandinavian Visual Culture
A nuanced history through comics: New perspectives on an old Danish love triangle
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A nuanced history through comics: New perspectives on an old Danish love triangle

This presentation discusses how the art form of comics can use media specific qualities to engage with and re-present historical events. The 2015 graphic novel I morgen bliver bedre by Karoline Stjernfelt takes on one of the most talked about periods in Danish history: the reign of Christian the 7th, his doctor Struensee and their relationship with the queen Caroline Mathilde. I argue that the use of page layout, composition, as well as a very strong focus on the emotional effects of coloring emphasize the role of the women in this story and helps build an understanding of the personal consequences for everyone involved. As Pierre Fresnault Deruelle notes, the tension between a tabular and a linear structure in comics is essential to the way narrative is organized which in I morgen bliver bedre is employed to great effect through a varied layout, juxtaposed pages and a particular use of color.

By:
Rikke Platz Cortsen
May 5, 2018, 11:10 am to 11:30 am
Hall: Laureate Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
   
11:15 am Après Joan
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Après Joan

In honor of the contributions of Joan Templeton

By:
Paal Bjoerby
May 5, 2018, 11:15 am to 11:25 am
Hall: Optimist B Track: Twenty plus Years of Ibsens Women Type: 20 min
   
11:20 am    
11:25 am Roundtable with Joan Templeton
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Roundtable with Joan Templeton

A roundtable discussion moderated by Dean Krouk

By:
Dean Krouk, Joan Templeton
May 5, 2018, 11:25 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: Twenty plus Years of Ibsens Women Type: Roundtable
   
11:30 am Societal frontiers: social constructs in Swedish language studies
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Societal frontiers: social constructs in Swedish language studies

Courses in Swedish as a foreign language (SFS) can be taken at universities or through private schools, and Swedish for immigrants (SFI) is offered at learning annexes all over the country. Swedish as a foreign language and Swedish for immigrants can be viewed as two separate disciplines, but practice shows that in some cases, the overlap between the two subjects is blurred. This becomes especially clear when looking more closely at course materials (books and online learning tools) used in educational settings. Even though culture and traditions are covered in both disciplines, mentions of social constructs seem to be lacking in SFS. This paper discusses to what extent social constructs are part of lesson materials for courses in SFS in comparison to SFI course materials.

By:
Elisabeth Drion
May 5, 2018, 11:30 am to 11:50 am
Hall: Centennial AB Track: Education Type: 20 min
Shifts in “Sweden-bashing:” Themes and tropes in the critical discourse on Sweden – comparing the 1980s and the 2010s
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Shifts in “Sweden-bashing:” Themes and tropes in the critical discourse on Sweden – comparing the 1980s and the 2010s

Like all societies, Sweden has its detractors and its supporters, its friends and foes. When and why do such divisive views and opinions gain salience and mobilizing capacity, at home and abroad? Simple categoriesof positive/negative cannot be usefully adapted into generalizable tools of either intellectual history or public diplomacy, as the social phenomena which attract criticism and acclaim shift over time and occasionally even supplant one another, defying binary logic. Comparing key themes and tropes in the critical accounts of Sweden in the 1980s and 2010s shows that it is rather shifts in themes and narratives which have driven change as well as caused interest in Sweden: In the 1980s, foreign as well as domestic “Sweden-bashing” primarily attacked the national welfare state in favor of free enterprise, international capitalism and conservative values. In the 2010s, by contrast, critical accounts of Swedish society invariably focus upon multiculturalism and openness in an alleged defense of the national welfare state. Not only does this spell a substantial shift in the underlying logic of Sweden-bashing, beyond simple binaries of positive-negative. It also confirms the remarkable resilience of the image of Sweden as the proverbial welfare state in the eyes of friends and foes alike.

By:
Carl Marklund
May 5, 2018, 11:30 am to 11:50 am
Hall: Legacy A Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Pushing boundaries from within: exploring the systemic organization of the online classroom
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Pushing boundaries from within: exploring the systemic organization of the online classroom

Digital technology has opened up for innovative, groundbreaking possibilities when it comes to methods and manners of teaching and learning. If we look at teaching and learning as communicative practices, these practices are changing in response to these new environments. In this paper I will look at the online hybrid classroom through the lens of Niklas Luhmann’s theory of social systems that are self-sustaining, or autopoietic. The definition of such systems points to a form of systemic organization that is reproductive from within themselves. Questions to be asked are thus: what is generated within the boundaries of this classroom domain; how can these boundaries be reconfigured and/or sustained in terms of the Luhmann’s regenerative process; and finally, what does it tell us about these new learning environments as pedagogical arenas?

By:
Aino Rinhaug
May 5, 2018, 11:30 am to 11:50 am
Hall: Legacy B Track: The Extended Classroom Type: 20 min
Crossing as the Earl of Donau: Queen Christina of Sweden, cross-dressing and traveling Europe incognito in the 17th century
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Crossing as the Earl of Donau: Queen Christina of Sweden, cross-dressing and traveling Europe incognito in the 17th century

Accounts of Queen Christina of Sweden’s personal desires run the gamut from the asexual to hypersexual with the sum of these statements amounting to a near relentless obsession with her personal relationships beginning in the 17th century. In this paper, I argue that the Queen’s frequent appearance in men’s apparel, a significant contributing factor to such salacious speculations, was a widely accepted social and political necessity. Recent scholarship on crossdressing in early modern Europe focuses on occurrences in theatrical productions and its use as a literary trope. While Christina dressed as a Roman warrior within a performative context, my focus is on real-world conditions and situational applications of crossdressing as described in contemporary accounts of Christina’s travel across Europe. Within these accounts I identify three specific and distinct reasons for the Queen’s adoption of her male alter-ego, the Earl of Donau, which are social, political, and personal in nature.

By:
Theresa Kutasz Christensen
May 5, 2018, 11:30 am to 11:50 am
Hall: Optimist A Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Volvo Trucks and Cowboy Hats - American Trucking Music Replanted in a Swedish Cultural Context
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Volvo Trucks and Cowboy Hats - American Trucking Music Replanted in a Swedish Cultural Context

Together with some other scholars I´m involved in a research project about different aspects on the changes of labor conditions among truck drivers in Sweden since the 1960s. In my own sub study I´m analyzing how the professional culture among Swedish truck drivers was related to the so-called trucking culture of the 1970s, a transnational professional as well as popular culture of mainly North American origin - how it was transformed, adapted and used in the Swedish context. In my presentation I will show how this process of transformation can be studied by comparing American and Swedish trucking music from the 1970s and 1980s. In what way did the Swedish versions of American trucking songs differ from their American originals? How were values in the American songs - for example family, nation and masculinity - preserved or transformed in their Swedish versions, and how can these variations be interpreted?

By:
Hans Wallengren
May 5, 2018, 11:30 am to 11:50 am
Hall: Exploration Track: Music and Identity Type: 20 min
Henry Parland and the different (sur)faces of things
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Henry Parland and the different (sur)faces of things

The finnish poet Henry Parland (1908–1930] was one of many artists during the early 20th Century commited to pushing everyday, material objects to the fore. While deeply involved in the modernistic project, Parland's dealings with the thing world also resonate well with contemporary theoretical attempts to flatten ontological hierarchies and make the human but one actor amongst a range of active bodies and forces. I intend to read Parland's poems alongside his manifesto 'Sakernas uppror' (Revolt of the objects), to shed light on his struggle with questions concerning both the nature of objects and the literary depiction of them.

By:
Ellen Frödin
May 5, 2018, 11:30 am to 11:50 am
Hall: Laureate Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
   
11:35 am    
11:40 am    
11:45 am    
11:50 am Education Question and Answer
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Education Question and Answer

Session Chair: Pernille Fiskerstrand

By:
Pernille Fiskerstrand
May 5, 2018, 11:50 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: Centennial AB Track: Education
Linguistics Question and Answer
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Linguistics Question and Answer

Session Chair: Gro-Renée Rambø

By:
Gro-Renée Rambø
May 5, 2018, 11:50 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: Legacy A Track: Linguistics
Extended Classroom - Question and Answer
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Extended Classroom - Question and Answer

For the past 20 years blended synchronous foreign language instruction (BSFLI) has gained momentum as a viable modus of delivering language instruction online – especially for the less commonly taught languages. This panel aims to present and discuss several aspects of BSFLI --- such as the theory of community of inquiry, technologies for active learning, pedagogical best practices and student learning outcome and experiences. Based on Nordic languages the panelists will share findings, everyday classroom experiences and showcase a live BSFLI class in action.

By:
Timothy R. Tangherlini
May 5, 2018, 11:50 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: Legacy B Track: The Extended Classroom
Question and Answer
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Question and Answer

Session Chair: Jason Lavery

By:
Jason Lavery
May 5, 2018, 11:50 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: Optimist A Track: General Papers
Music and Identity Question and Answer
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Music and Identity Question and Answer

Session Chair: Aurelijus Vijunas

By:
Aurelijus Vijunas
May 5, 2018, 11:50 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: Exploration Track: Music and Identity
Question and Answer
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Question and Answer

Session Chair: Claus Elholm Andersen

By:
Claus Elholm Andersen
May 5, 2018, 11:50 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: Laureate Track: General Papers
   
11:55 am    
12:00 pm   SHS lunch time meeting     Ibsen Society of America lunch time meeting   Women's Caucus lunch time meeting   Lunch  
12:05 pm            
12:10 pm     NorTANA Charrette meeting      
12:15 pm          
12:20 pm          
12:25 pm          
12:30 pm          
12:35 pm          
12:40 pm          
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1:00 pm          
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1:30 pm Nynorsk as main language – high proficiency in Norwegian
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Nynorsk as main language – high proficiency in Norwegian

A survey of written language use among young people who have learned Nynorsk as their main language showed that half of them write Bokmål at work, ten years after they had left secondary school. In the private sphere the majority use a form of the written language that is closely influenced by their dialect. In other words, they do not simply have a command of just one written variety, but make use of the whole range of their proficiency in Norwegian and adapt the written form according to whom they are writing. A large majority of the young people consider it an advantage that they have learnt to write both Nynorsk and Bokmål, and they themselves judge 'whether they are allowed' to use their Nynorsk variety when they write in Norwegian.

By:
Anne Steinsvik Nordal
May 5, 2018, 1:30 pm to 1:50 pm
Hall: Centennial AB Track: Language Pedagogy Type: 20 min
The Reification of Literature in Golden Age Denmark
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The Reification of Literature in Golden Age Denmark

Both Hans Christian Andersen and Kierkegaard lamented the reification of literature in Golden Age Denmark, a development which was brought on by a reading public increasingly seeking temporary diversion, instead of lasting edification. This change in orientation is the Leserevolution, as Rolf Engelsing defines it, a phenomenon furthered by technological advances in printing and papermaking, and responsible for the ubiquity of printed matter in nineteenth-century Europe. Andersen witnessed his first book, Ungdoms-Forsøg, be repurposed as wrapping paper, and his tales 'Nissen hos Spekhøkeren' and 'Tante Tandpine' reflect this traumatic experience. Kierkegaard, on the other hand, saw the lavish New Year’s gift books of his nemesis J. L. Heiberg as a form of reification, in that they made the book form into an aesthetic curio, instead of an intellectual object. Since, as Kierkegaard alleged, Heiberg’s New Year’s gifts were contentless trifles, they became reified as useless things after the holiday season.

By:
Troy Wellington Smith
May 5, 2018, 1:30 pm to 1:50 pm
Hall: Legacy A Track: Danish Literature Type: 20 min
Political Communication in the North: Differentiating Norwegian Nationalisms
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Political Communication in the North: Differentiating Norwegian Nationalisms

When considering traditional political landscapes in European politics we typically associate nationalism with right-wing parties. In the North elements of nationalism are more evenly distributed across the political spectrum, diluting the analytical utility of the term. This paper seeks to differentiate nationalisms found in various political movements in Norway to offer greater clarity when discussing Norwegian Politics. There are two feats of political communication that are particularly counterintuitive given the broader strokes of Norwegian history and European poltical history. The first of these is the retention of nationalisms by the left-wing bloc of parties. The second is the success the right-wing bloc has had employing nationalisms to fuel their rise to governance in 2012. In this paper a quantitative exploration of differences in voting patterns in Norwegian local and federal elections sets the stage for differentiating how nationalisms are expressed in Norwegian political parties.

By:
Carl Martin Graefe
May 5, 2018, 1:30 pm to 1:50 pm
Hall: Legacy B Track: Scandinavia in International Relations Type: 20 min
IKEA as Utopian Imaginary
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IKEA as Utopian Imaginary

My paper is an interdisciplinary study about the spatiality of IKEA and how it functions as a global representation of 'exported' Sweden, including principles of Nordic design and cultural values like minimalism and mys (understood through the popularized conception of Danish hygge in the US). Recently published novels like Horrorstör (US, 2014) and The Extraordinary Journey of the Fakir Who Got Trapped in an Ikea Wardrobe (France, 2013; a film adaptation is slated to release in 2018) demonstrate the international appeal of using the unique IKEA retail space in literature to work through important social issues like immigration and globalization. By tracing such depictions of IKEA in literature, film, and other media (including IKEA's own website and promotional materials), I examine how it operates as a space of fantasy and possibility, especially to areas outside the Nordic region who conceive of Scandinavia as a kind of utopia.

By:
Richelle Wilson
May 5, 2018, 1:30 pm to 1:50 pm
Hall: Optimist A Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Fairy Tale Transcended: Henrik Ibsen's The Lady from the Sea
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Fairy Tale Transcended: Henrik Ibsen's The Lady from the Sea

The title of Henrik Ibsen's 1888 play in the first draft was Havfruen (The Mermaid); it became in the final copy Fruen fra havet (The Lady from the Sea).  This shift includes the same elements--sea and woman--but the transition alters a fixed fairy tale descriptor into a description of a female in transit.  This study proposes to investigate the transcending of that fixed form into an active reconfiguration, first by considering the pair of secondary characters, Bolette and Arnholm, and then by developing at length Ellida's pairing with The Stranger and the repairing of her engagement with her husband Wangel.

By:
Sandra Saari
May 5, 2018, 1:30 pm to 1:50 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: Ibsen Type: 20 min
Machine Vision and the Photographic Archive
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Machine Vision and the Photographic Archive

Eight thousand photographs from Lund, taken by the Swedish photographer Per Bagge (1866-1936), form the core of a new project at the intersection of photographic history and computational visual analysis.  Convolutional Neural Networks, a form of machine learning that mirrors how the human brain processes vision, offer new and intriguging possibilities for 'distant viewing' of large-scale image collections.  This talk examines some of the characteristics of what artificial intelligence can 'see', with a focus on early 20th-century photographic culture in Sweden.

By:
Peter Leonard
May 5, 2018, 1:30 pm to 1:50 pm
Hall: Exploration Track: Digital Humanities Type: 20 min
Ludvig Holberg at the frontiers of history writing
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Ludvig Holberg at the frontiers of history writing

The writing of history has not always been as it is today. From classical historiography, where the Ciceronian definition of 'truth' dominated, to the foundations of modern history as an evidence-based science in the 19th century; the inspirations and paradigms under which historians have worked have always existed in a state of flux. In the 18th century, history writing was on the brink of change – but the exact nature of that change was unclear even to those who would effect it. This paper will use the diverse historical works of Danish-Norwegian Enlightenment figure Ludvig Holberg (1684-1754) as a case study to examine some of these processes. These include the paradoxical centrality of classical and Hebrew myth within history, Divine Providence as the default mode of causality, the tonal shift from moral to narrative history, as well as the increasing importance of evidence as the mark of historical truth.

By:
Are Bøe Pedersen
May 5, 2018, 1:30 pm to 1:50 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: Holberg Type: 20 min
Literature in use – the concept of 'Use' and it’s history in Danish literary debate.
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Literature in use – the concept of 'Use' and it’s history in Danish literary debate.

This paper offers a general introduction to the term 'use'. You will find a whole range of users on different leves and with different purposes, such as for example the welfare state; poets; readers; newspapers; scholars in history, philosophy, and literature; teachers on all levels; and preachers. By outlining different and sometime competing kinds of use, I will discuss how the term through a time period of the last 30 years has got a bad reputation in literary critique and teaching literature. Use is closely related to a concept of abuse and making literature a means to an end. But, as I will argue, everybody is using literature for a purpose, wheter it is for entertainment; to achieve cultural capital; to learn to write and read; to make research in literary history; or for self-development. It is the way of using it that leads to disagreements and mutual contempt.

By:
Lars Handesten
May 5, 2018, 1:30 pm to 1:50 pm
Hall: Laureate Track: Uses of Literature Type: 20 min
   
1:35 pm    
1:40 pm    
1:45 pm    
1:50 pm Rethinking grammar as an approach to teaching Nynorsk
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Rethinking grammar as an approach to teaching Nynorsk

The two varieties of Norwegian, Bokmål and Nynorsk, are both official written languages in Norway and are taught in mandatory education either as a first-choice or second-choice variety. However, Bokmål is the dominant language in newspapers, literature and on Norwegian Internet pages, and Nynorsk is less present in students´ everyday lives. Teaching Nynorsk as a second-choice variety is considered challenging by Norwegian teachers and is often taught through a grammar-translation approach, even though such methods have been documented as ineffective in acquiring a written language. Students frequently struggle to write correctly and consequently have low confidence as Nynorsk writers. Through my study of teaching methods in Nynorsk I have examined how high school students express their challenges and affordances in learning to write Nynorsk. In this presentation, I will look at the teaching of Nynorsk in light of international research in English speaking countries, which discusses the role of grammar in language teaching.

By:
Kristin Kibsgaard Sjohelle
May 5, 2018, 1:50 pm to 2:10 pm
Hall: Centennial AB Track: Language Pedagogy Type: 20 min
Brandes and the Poles
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Brandes and the Poles

It is customary to divide the long career of Georg Brandes into two distinct phases. From his momentous Copenhagen lecture of November 3, 1871 through the next two decades, Brandes is the 'activist critic,' the father of the Modern Breakthrough, the single figure who ushered Nordic authors into the new domain of socially and politically engaged problemlitteratur. Following his fateful encounter with Nietzsche at the conclusion of the 1880s, the critic largely reinvented himself, becoming the principal exponent of a Nietzsche-inflected 'aristocratic radicalism' and devoting the reminder of his working life to voluminous monographs on the great heroes of European culture, among them Shakespeare, Goethe, Julius Caesar. While there is considerable value in this distinction, it overlooks an equally significant aspect of the critic’s late work, namely his vigorous direct advocacy work on behalf of national minorities, stateless peoples and the colonized, a great mass of peoples he referred to as undertrykte folkeslag. Between 1900 and 1925, Brandes would produce no less than thirty-five essays and speeches on the widest variety of unfortunate peoples, in some way providing the model for the kind of international human rights advocacy so prevalent in 20th and 21st century discourse. This paper examines the large body of work the critic produced on the fate of the single people he loved most dearly and for whom he worked most tirelessly, namely the thirty million or so souls of Greater Polonia, since the end of the 18th century dispersed under Austrian, Prussian and Russian suzerainty. From his initial efforts in support of the Września Children’s Strike through the catastrophe of the Great War, the critic produced a sum total of eight substantial pieces on Polish affairs, in the process engendering the opprobrium of not only the public of the great powers, but also, perhaps even more so, that of the 'minority within the minority,' the significant Ruthenian and Jewish communities of partitioned Poland.    

By:
William Banks
May 5, 2018, 1:50 pm to 2:10 pm
Hall: Legacy A Track: Danish Literature Type: 20 min
Greener Than Them: Perceptions of Environmental Commitment Above the Arctic Circle
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Greener Than Them: Perceptions of Environmental Commitment Above the Arctic Circle

States promote reputations for both internal population consumption and international promotion. While the Scandinavian states are frequently recognized as ‘welfare states,’ recent years have seen active promotion of their reputations as ‘ecological states.’ Scandinavian societies are among the most sustainability-conscious in the world, yet internal perceptions of environmental commitment vary across demographics. Within Arctic communities, the ‘Nordic’ majority populations tend to view minority groups as less capable of ecological commitment. These perceptions are facilitated by the ‘us-vs-them’ mentality of homogenous societies, non-inclusion of local knowledge in public environmental dialogue, and the adoption of majority practices among circumpolar minority communities. I examine these trends in context of Greenlandic Inuit, Finnish Sami, and Svalbard-based immigrants in Norway. When these minority populations adopt non-environmental practices from the majority Nordic cultures, the groups are perceived as less ‘green’ by both the majority Scandinavian societies and the states.

By:
Ellen Ahlness
May 5, 2018, 1:50 pm to 2:10 pm
Hall: Legacy B Track: Scandinavia in International Relations Type: 20 min
Tingles for Profit: ASMR Advertising and the 'Oddly IKEA' Video
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Tingles for Profit: ASMR Advertising and the 'Oddly IKEA' Video

IKEA is known for its innovative advertising in its efforts to 'export Swedish democracy' to the world. In the fall of 2017, IKEA produced a 25-minute long ad, 'Oddly IKEA,' in the style of ASMR videos to promote its dorm room furnishings. ASMR stands for Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response, a nonscientific phrase for the tingling sensation—or 'braingasm'—that some people experience when listening to recorded sounds such as whispering, tapping, crinkling, and squishing. In this paper, I consider how race, gender, and Swedishness are figured in 'Oddly IKEA.' I also explore how the 'democratic,' youth-driven ASMR community intersects with corporate advertising. I argue that, much as the interactive model home simultaneously 'exposes and promotes' itself (Sandberg), 'Oddly IKEA' celebrates and mocks both corporate advertising and the ASMR genre in ways that have powerful appeal for the video’s target audience.

By:
Ida Moen Johnson
May 5, 2018, 1:50 pm to 2:10 pm
Hall: Optimist A Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
The contact of the Romanian cultural agents with Henrik Ibsen’s plays, 1894-1947
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The contact of the Romanian cultural agents with Henrik Ibsen’s plays, 1894-1947

The aim of this paper is to present the contribution of the most important Romanian actors and directors that actively promoted Henrik Ibsen’s plays in Romania in the 1894-1947 period. Based on visual and statistical information provided by IbsenStage Performance Database, this theatre historiographical approach uses as a starting point Digital Humanities tools as maps and frequency lists. The topic is further investigated through Romanian theatre history, biographies and memoires of the actors, as well as information from theatre reviews. These sources support the digital data and clarify the context in which Henrik Ibsen’s plays were introduced to the Romanian public for the first time. The paper highlights the contribution of important Romanian directors and actors such as Petre Sturdza, Paul Gusty and Ion Manolescu, but also actresses such as Aglae Pruteanu, Mărioara Voiculescu and Agepsina Macri-Eftimiu.

By:
Gianina Druta
May 5, 2018, 1:50 pm to 2:10 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: Ibsen Type: 20 min
Killing the Berserk: A Network Analysis of Revenge, Compensation and the Berserkir in Icelandic Family Sagas
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Killing the Berserk: A Network Analysis of Revenge, Compensation and the Berserkir in Icelandic Family Sagas

According to the sagas, murder in Viking-age Iceland was generally answered in one of two ways: either the wronged party received compensation for the killing, or the wronged party took revenge. It is well established that these interactions can quickly escalate into larger feuds between groups. In this paper, we examine the role of berserkir in these feuds. Robin Dunbar, for example, has suggested that the mere presence of a berserkir in a family is enough to motivate the aggrieved party to seek compensation. Through the application of network analysis and statistics on a series of Icelandic family sagas, we explore how reactions to murder change when berserkir are involved. Does the murderer’s relationship to a berserkr change the probability with which an aggrieved party is likely to seek compensation? In our work, we discover two separate classes of berserkir functional in the Icelandic family saga: the first, and most common class, are those that are introduced simply to be killed, allowing a more central saga character to increase his status. We liken this narrative strategy to the well-known Worf effect of comic books. The second class of berserkir, which is considerably smaller, play a meaningful role in the interaction network of the saga. This class of berserkir are the main focus of our analysis.

By:
James Holland, Timothy R. Tangherlini
May 5, 2018, 1:50 pm to 2:10 pm
Hall: Exploration Track: Digital Humanities Type: 20 min
Towards a Poetics of Mobility in Holberg’s Fictional Writings
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Towards a Poetics of Mobility in Holberg’s Fictional Writings

In the past, Holberg scholarship has experienced many difficulties with categorizing Holberg’s works and assess his place within European literature. By considering Holberg as an eclectic (Sejersted, Olesen) and as a writer of world literature (Larsen), scholarship has recently put effort into revaluing the paradoxical and versatile aspects of Holberg’s authorship. This paper follows this recent tendency, but wants to look at Holberg as a narrator. I will argue that in the course of his carreer, Holberg developed a set of narrative techniques that were aimed at evoking a mobile and versatile reading process. This development trained readers to become critical and Enlightenement thinkers, while it allowed Holberg to find his own voice in European literature. The hypothesized poetics of mobility are thus aimed at revaluing Holberg as a European writer who was well aware of the poetical and aesthetic vogues in the dominant literary countries, and was much more an innovator and cosmopolitan than traditionally acknowledged.

By:
Thomas Velle
May 5, 2018, 1:50 pm to 2:10 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: Holberg Type: 20 min
Uses of Reading In and With Knausgård
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Uses of Reading In and With Knausgård

Our presentation will discuss in a dialogic manner how Knausgård himself as a fictional reader and real readers use literature to negotiate and construct identities. We will take Knausgård’s work as a point of departure. On the one hand, Camilla Schwartz will discuss how Knausgård uses his literary capital to understand, investigate and construct feelings and identity and how he as an author enables new recognition processes between text and reader. On the other hand, Anita Wohlmann will discuss professional identity formation in narrative medicine courses where medical students and doctors in continuing education read an excerpt of Knausgård’s My Struggle: Book 1. In using literature as a productive space of self-reflection, Knausgård as a fictional reader and the real readers of his work are encouraged to develop a professional identity of their own.

By:
Anita Wohlmann, Camilla Schwartz
May 5, 2018, 1:50 pm to 2:10 pm
Hall: Laureate Track: Uses of Literature Type: 20 min
   
1:55 pm    
2:00 pm    
2:05 pm    
2:10 pm Language Pedagogy Question and Answer
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Language Pedagogy Question and Answer

Session Chair: Anne Steinsvik Nordal

By:
Anne Steinsvik Nordal
May 5, 2018, 2:10 pm to 2:50 pm
Hall: Centennial AB Track: Language Pedagogy
Ragnhild Goldschmidt and Alleotheta
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Ragnhild Goldschmidt and Alleotheta

Ragnhild Goldschmidt (1828 - 1890) was one of the 'daughters' of nineteenth-century Danish literature yet alien to most discussions of European fiction. She anonymously published short fiction and unlike her brother, Meïr Aaron Goldschmidt, she did not write from the perspective of a Jewish mentalite or milieu, at least not on the surface of the text. Instead, Ragnhild Goldschmidt wrote about contemporary issues like power, gender, and social solitude. This talk explores how Goldschmidt coded her Jewishness into her short story 'Without Kin' (1878).

By:
Gantt Gurley
May 5, 2018, 2:10 pm to 2:30 pm
Hall: Legacy A Track: Danish Literature Type: 20 min
The Norwegian International Ship Register: An important innovation or a contradiction in terms?
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The Norwegian International Ship Register: An important innovation or a contradiction in terms?

The Norwegian International Ship Register (NIS) – established in Bergen in 1987 – gave Norwegian shipping 'the kiss of life' after several years of crisis. The register enabled Norwegian shipping companies to use low-cost foreign seafarers, and still fly the Norwegian flag. The NIS was both a (passive) response to developments in shipping and an (active) precursor of what was to come. The paper discusses the basis for and effects of the establishment of the NIS, the first ‘open register’ and an institutional innovation in world shipping. It places the register in an international context, and also discusses specifically the processes that led to its establishment in Bergen, including the lobbying by local interest groups.

By:
Stig Tenold
May 5, 2018, 2:10 pm to 2:30 pm
Hall: Legacy B Track: Scandinavia in International Relations Type: 20 min
Lively Objects and Passive Subjects: The Ecological Eye of Aki Kaurismäki
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Lively Objects and Passive Subjects: The Ecological Eye of Aki Kaurismäki

The nonhuman objects of Aki Kaurismäki’s films are often seen as belonging to the moral universe of melodrama, infused with nostalgic meaning. They are objects of human desire and human longing. From an ecocritical perspective, however, Kaurismäki’s focus on the nonhuman invites us to think about broader ecological relationships where humans are as vulnerable to outside forces as nonhuman objects and nonhuman objects possess a greater vitality than we often realize. Disrupting the conventional anthropocentric drama with a motivated camera that follows the nonhuman 'subjects' and lingers on them before cutting to the next scene, Kaurismäki visually represents an ecologically sensitive distributive agency. This ecocritical reading, like the melodramatic ones, ultimately understands his emphasis on the nonhuman as a critique of unethical neoliberal values, which disrupt and exploit natural processes.

By:
Camille Richey
May 5, 2018, 2:10 pm to 2:30 pm
Hall: Optimist A Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
Ibsen's Empty Nurseries: Symbolism and Socio-Architectural Traces
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Ibsen's Empty Nurseries: Symbolism and Socio-Architectural Traces

The first three of Henrik Ibsen’s last five dramas—Hedda Gabler, The Master Builder, and Little Eyolf—all mention the emptying and repurposing of space originally intended for children. In this paper, I examine the symbolic and material characteristics of these nurseries, offering a glimpse of some traces of middle class children’s rooms from 19th century Norway, and acknowledging how this historical-architectural space (almost) gives way to absence and emptiness in Ibsen’s plays. On the on hand, Ibsen’s empty nurseries are themselves little more than traces. Like his child characters, they remain obscure, because Ibsen was more interested in the fallout of unviable reproduction than in the specific features and functions of children’s space. On the other hand, nurseries have a class identity that cannot be stripped away. Finally, the symbolic and material characteristics of nurseries enable concluding commentary on the perennial friction between realism and symbolism in Ibsen studies.

By:
Olivia Noble Gunn
May 5, 2018, 2:10 pm to 2:30 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: Ibsen Type: 20 min
Using Digital Humanities Techniques to Investigate Racist Rhetoric – The Case of Norwegian Anti-Semitism
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Using Digital Humanities Techniques to Investigate Racist Rhetoric – The Case of Norwegian Anti-Semitism

While it is true that Anti-Semitism never became a mass movement in Norway, it is not difficult to find examples of books and articles propagating a strong Anti-Semitic message in the Norwegian public sphere in the inter-war era. I will present innovative digital humanities methods used to chart antisemitism in the Norwegian newspapers. I will (1) start by giving a brief description of Anti-Semitic and racist rhetoric in general, (2) give some examples of from publications from the period and try to trace some of the basic tropes and figures of this rhetoric and then (3) use quantitative, digital humanities-methods to try to answer the question of how common and central these Anti-Semitic tropes and figures were in the public sphere during this period. In conclusion I will describe how I have estimated the proportion of negative and positive material on the Jews in Norwegian newspapers from 1918-1940.

By:
Frode Helland
May 5, 2018, 2:10 pm to 2:30 pm
Hall: Exploration Track: Digital Humanities Type: 20 min
Transcending Frontiers of Literature. Reflections of Law in Holberg’s Fiction
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Transcending Frontiers of Literature. Reflections of Law in Holberg’s Fiction

Ludvig Holberg was very engaged with law; he wrote on natural law and came into contact with different legal institutions. Law also plays a big role in Holberg’s fictional works, both as a recurrent theme, often in conflict to moral justice, and in frequently used motifs, such as the procurator. Although the fictional works offers critical perspectives to law, it is not always clear which part of the legal system (or legal culture) that is being criticized. I will suggest that even though Holberg’s fiction points to problematic relations between legal practice and moral justice, the reflections can also be applied to particular conditions inside the borders of the contemporary Danish-Norwegian legal culture. Further I will discuss how Holberg’s works transgress the frontiers of literature by moving into legal discourse, thus illuminating literature both as a transcending form of communication and as a genre with immanent potential for social critique.

By:
Erlend Liisberg
May 5, 2018, 2:10 pm to 2:30 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: Holberg Type: 20 min
Using Literature, Building a Community – The Basilisk Group as an Example
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Using Literature, Building a Community – The Basilisk Group as an Example

Besides individual entertainment, the use of literature also has a socializing dimension: the reading of a particular kind of literature might imply entrance into a group of people with shared values and passions. One such group is the circle around the small Danish publishing house Basilisk, which has been a significant agent in the literary landscape in Denmark since the turn of the millennium. Basilisk is more than just a business; it is also a readership and as such a dedicated community – run by a group of writers who are all intimate friends. When these writers took over Basilisk around 2000, they jointly engaged in the kind of outlandish and non-canonized literary works they love, among other things by translating and publishing them in the highly praised Basilisk Babel series, using them as a means to build a community that serves as a bulwark against both the state and the market.

By:
Johanne Gormsen Schmidt
May 5, 2018, 2:10 pm to 2:30 pm
Hall: Laureate Track: Uses of Literature Type: 20 min
   
2:15 pm    
2:20 pm    
2:25 pm    
2:30 pm Danish Literature Question and Answer
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Danish Literature Question and Answer

Session Chair: Gantt Gurley

By:
Gantt Gurley
May 5, 2018, 2:30 pm to 2:50 pm
Hall: Legacy A Track: Danish Literature
Scandinavians as Inspirational Policy Learners
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Scandinavians as Inspirational Policy Learners

Denmark, Norway and Sweden have long been portrayed as inspirational models for the development of politics and public policies for other countries. What is less recognized is that the Scandinavians should also be considered as inspirational policy leaners from abroad. This paper argues that the Scandinavian inspirational model is intrinsically linked to their willingness and ability to learn from experience, their own and others’

By:
Trygve Ugland
May 5, 2018, 2:30 pm to 2:50 pm
Hall: Legacy B Track: Scandinavia in International Relations Type: 20 min
Party like a criminal': Erik Lundin’s Allegorical Suedi & Postnational Swedish Identity
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Party like a criminal': Erik Lundin’s Allegorical Suedi & Postnational Swedish Identity

In November 2017, Swedish rap-artist Erik Lundin released a music video for his song Haffla. In conjunction with the video, the lyrics to the song were published in the Swedish daily Metro. The song originally came out in 2015, but regardless of the two years between it and the video’s release, the respective messages appear disconnected, if not incompatible. Whereas the lyrics rely on more generic tropes of rap and hip-hop, like hustling, misogyny, and violence, the video offers a polished and bourgeois depiction of a traditional Swedish midsummer party. In order to read the contrast between the song and the music video, we will also analyze Lundin’s two other main singles released contemporaneously, Suedi and Välkommen hem. Focusing on expressions of identity in these works, we will examine how Lundin’s narrative builds from a personal coming-of-age story to progressively incorporate a broader socio-political agenda which embraces a postnational ideology.

By:
Maïmouna Jagne-Soreau, Maxine Savage
May 5, 2018, 2:30 pm to 2:50 pm
Hall: Optimist A Track: General Papers Type: 20 min
In search of the ‘actual’ Ibsen: the emergence of a modernist theatre-going culture in late nineteenth-century Munich and Berlin
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In search of the ‘actual’ Ibsen: the emergence of a modernist theatre-going culture in late nineteenth-century Munich and Berlin

The significance of Ibsen’s work for late nineteenth-century Germany has been well-established. From the naturalism movement in the 1880s to Max Reinhardt’s infamous production of Ghosts in 1906, theatre makers sought to continuously rediscover Ibsen’s work and challenge contemporary conceptions of cultural engagement. This paper reads the German Ibsen reception, with a particular focus on Munich and Berlin, as a forum for cultural (ex-)change. From theatre matinees in Berlin to an infamous literary salon in Munich, it aims to demonstrate to what extent the engagement with Ibsen’s work not only provoked a re-thinking of contemporary socio-cultural issues but furthermore, a fundamental reconception of how to generate cultural innovation.

By:
Ruth Schor
May 5, 2018, 2:30 pm to 2:50 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: Ibsen Type: 20 min
Digital collections of 19th-century Icelandic intellectuals and culture creators
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Digital collections of 19th-century Icelandic intellectuals and culture creators

The second half of the 19th century was a prolific time for Icelandic intellectuals who attempted to create a modern national culture in a country striving for independence. The paper will summarise the outcomes of two interlinked digital projects focusing on the key figures of 'The Evening Society' (Kveldfélagið): Jón Árnason (1918–1888), 'the father of Icelandic folklore collection', and Sigurður Guðmundsson (1833–1874), the 'father' of national costume, the national theatre and the museum. The projects were collaborations between the leading Icelandic cultural heritage institutions including the National Library of Iceland, the National Museum, the Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies and the University of Iceland. The main outcome are digital archives of scanned and transcribed letters, minutes and other primary materials (sigurdurmalari.hi.is, jonarnason.is) which are also integrated with a geographically mapped database of Icelandic folk legends (sagnagrunnur.com).

By:
Rósa Þórsteinsdóttir
May 5, 2018, 2:30 pm to 2:50 pm
Hall: Exploration Track: Digital Humanities Type: 20 min
Masquerade' in Ludvig Holberg’s fiction – and historiography
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Masquerade' in Ludvig Holberg’s fiction – and historiography

Dealing with the works of the Dano-Norwegian writer Ludvig Holberg (1684-1754), the concept of 'masquerade' is central in many ways. Not only is it the title of one of his numerous comedies: When writing and publishing them, he also kept on exploring a 'masquerade' as a writer, in his self-conscious play with pseudonyms such as 'Hans Mickelsen' and 'Just Justesen' – both fictive names Holberg had introduced in his debut as a fictional writer. Holberg kept exploring and playing with masks and pseudonyms the rest of his career. Looking closer at his pseudonyms, however, one can trace a certain development towards blurring the division between fiction and reality. Holberg’s progressive exploration of masks and pseudonyms in his fictional writings is widely known and recognized. In my paper, I shall discuss to what extent Holberg’s exploration of pseudonyms, his 'masquerade', also can be traced in his non-fictional writings – namely in his historiography.

By:
Inga Henriette Undheim
May 5, 2018, 2:30 pm to 2:50 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: Holberg Type: 20 min
Using the ghetto, use in the ghetto: Literary history of Danish “Slums in the Sky”
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Using the ghetto, use in the ghetto: Literary history of Danish “Slums in the Sky”

Ghettoes are not designed as such; due to complex processes, certain areas in or near cities deteriorate and become ghettoes. We might shorthand these processes ghettoization and think, not least, of a certain way of building and planning as well as economic, social and ethnic segregation. However, ghettoization is not only made up of material processes, but also of the public discourses that label certain areas as ghettoes and, in subtle or not so subtle ways, place the responsibility for the deterioration of these areas on the people who live there. In my talk, I will tell the story of the Danish ghettoes and relate it to the (ab)use of the ghetto concept within contemporary political discourse in Denmark and the ways in which literature is used in the present wave of works depicting life among the tower blocks.

By:
Jon Helt Haarder
May 5, 2018, 2:30 pm to 2:50 pm
Hall: Laureate Track: Uses of Literature Type: 20 min
   
2:35 pm    
2:40 pm    
2:45 pm    
2:50 pm     Scandinavia in International Relations Question and Answer
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Scandinavia in International Relations Question and Answer

Session Chair: Ellen Ahlness

By:
Ellen Ahlness
May 5, 2018, 2:50 pm to 3:10 pm
Hall: Legacy B Track: Scandinavia in International Relations
Tropes of Disability and the Freakish Other in Dogme 95
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Tropes of Disability and the Freakish Other in Dogme 95

Early Dogme 95 films played upon an opposition between bourgeois Scandinavian normality and the unacceptable/ unaccepted outsiders. In two cases it did this by posing disability as the freakish other to well-ordered Nordic social norms, with disabled individuals – or the simulation of disability – acting as a subversive, destabilizing element. Through a dialogue with the academic discourse around freaks initiated by Leslie Fiedler, this paper will interrogate the ways Lars von Trier’s Idioterne and Søren Kragh-Jacobsen’s Mifunes sidste sang, together with some associated projects, use disability as the ultimate trope of otherness. As such it serves, loosely, as a sequel to my previous SASS paper.

By:
Theo Malekin
May 5, 2018, 2:50 pm to 3:10 pm
Hall: Optimist A Track: Contemporary film Type: 20 min
Ibsen Question and Answer
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Ibsen Question and Answer

Session Chair: Olivia Noble Gunn

By:
Olivia Noble Gunn
May 5, 2018, 2:50 pm to 3:10 pm
Hall: Optimist B Track: Ibsen
Digital Humanities Question and Answer
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Digital Humanities Question and Answer

Session Chair: Peter Leonard

By:
Peter Leonard
May 5, 2018, 2:50 pm to 3:10 pm
Hall: Exploration Track: Digital Humanities
Holberg Question and Answer
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Holberg Question and Answer

By:
Paal Bjoerby
May 5, 2018, 2:50 pm to 3:10 pm
Hall: Illumination Track: Holberg
Uses of literaure - the social dimension of literature Question and Answer
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Uses of literaure - the social dimension of literature Question and Answer

The widening of the themes and functions of Nordic literature since World War II has opened new relations to culture, science and society. We need to recognize not only the effects of large-scale welfare history on literature, but also how texts interact with the world around them, transmitting but also reshaping ideas and dispositions, uniquely engaged both as effect and as cause. The panel focuses on the concept “use” and “usability” in relation to contemporary Nordic literature. The panel discusses how the concept “use” has appeared in literary critique of the latest decades, and the panel focuses on the concept of “use” in relation to concepts of recognition and identification, “use” in literary methodology and literary theory on auto-fiction and bestsellers. Contemporary Nordic text by Naja Marie Aidt, Klaus Lynggaard, Caroline Albertine Minor, Maria Gerhardt, Yahya Hassan, Morten Pape, and Karl Ove Knausgård will be discussed. Participants from University of Southern Denmark: Associate professor Camilla Schwartz, Associate Professor Jon Helt Haarder, Associate Professor Lars Handesten, assistant professor Anita Wohlmann and PhD-Candidate Johanne Gormsen Schmidt. The panel is organized by professor Anne-Marie Mai, SDU.

By:
Anne-Marie Mai
May 5, 2018, 2:50 pm to 3:10 pm
Hall: Laureate Track: Uses of Literature Type: 20 min
   
2:55 pm        
3:00 pm        
3:05 pm        
3:10 pm       Question and Answer